The Seventh Nebula

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Hello Everyone,

I want to translate the phrase "The Seventh Nebula."

My Latin is decent but definitely not the best.
However, when I tried my hand at translating this, I kept coming up with:
Septum Nebula
Septum Nebulae

Would "Nebula" be Nominative (as the subject) or Accusative (as the object)?
How would this be translated?

Thanks for the help in advance!
 

Westcott

Civis Illustris
Septima nebula
The endings would only need to change if you are writing a whole phrase or sentence in Latin.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Septima nebula
The endings would only need to change if you are writing a whole phrase or sentence in Latin.
Thanks for the translation and the additional grammatical insight.
Also, in Latin, what would be considered a whole phrase?
 

Westcott

Civis Illustris
In English you might write "to septima nebula" but the Latin equivalent would be "ad septimam nebulam"
Incidentally, if you prefer the sound, nebula septima would be just as good (and possibly better grammar, to put the adjective after the noun).
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Incidentally, if you prefer the sound, nebula septima would be just as good (and possibly better grammar, to put the adjective after the noun).
Nebula Septima would make for a great translation.


In English you might write "to septima nebula" but the Latin equivalent would be "ad septimam nebulam"
So adding "to" (or in Latin, Ad) effectively makes it a phrase?
Is there a certain grammatical rule in Latin that specifies what's generally required for something to become a phrase?
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
As in English, a phrase can take forms in any grammatical case.

Nominative: Nebula Septima = "The seventh nebula"
Genitive: Nebulae Septimae = "of the seventh nebula"
Dative: Nebulae Septimae = "for the seventh nebula"
(Dative is the indirect object - other translations are possible)
Accusative: (Ad) Nebulam Septimam = (To) the seventh nebula
(Direct object, also object of certain prepositions)
Ablative: (In) Nebula Septima = (In) the seventh nebula
(Other prepositions and translations are possible)
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
As in English, a phrase can take forms in any grammatical case.

Nominative: Nebula Septima = "The seventh nebula"
Genitive: Nebulae Septimae = "of the seventh nebula"
Dative: Nebulae Septimae = "for the seventh nebula"
(Dative is the indirect object - other translations are possible)
Accusative: (Ad) Nebulam Septimam = (To) the seventh nebula
(Direct object, also object of certain prepositions)
Ablative: (In) Nebula Septima = (In) the seventh nebula
(Other prepositions and translations are possible)
This is very useful info to know.
I will use this as a reference for future conjugations.
Thanks scrabulista!
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
This is very useful info to know.
I will use this as a reference for future conjugations.
Thanks scrabulista!
"conjugation" refers to the endings of verbs. "declension" refers to the endings of nouns. "inflection" refers to both.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
"conjugation" refers to the endings of verbs. "declension" refers to the endings of nouns. "inflection" refers to both.
I didn't realize that I was referencing it wrong the whole time...
What would inflections of adjectives be called then?
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Oh, those are declensions as well.
 
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