"the tree of our lives draws his strenght upon the roots of our love"

LorioL

New Member
Hello everyone,
first of all I'd like to apologize for my english, because I'm french, but I'll do my best.
I'm getting married soon, and I'd like to print a little maxim into the wedding rings. As you can see in the title of the thread I'd like to translate :
"the tree of our lives draws its strenght upon the roots of our love."
I know it's kinda "cliché", but I think that it can be pretty powerfull in latin.
I dont know if it might help but here's the french version :
"L'arbre de nos vies puise sa force dans les racines de notre amour."
I'm sorry, I took only one year of latin, and it was 20 years ago, so I am not able to do this translation on my own.
I thank you all for reading this that far, and even more if you take time to answer or translate.
Have a nice day.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I dont know if it might help but here's the french version :
"L'arbre de nos vies puise sa force dans les racines de notre amour."
Here is an attempt to get as close to the French motto as classical Latin allows it:

arbor nostrarum vitarum haurit vim suam de radicibus nostri amoris.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
"nostrarum vitarum" is rather bulky of course ... you could think about whether you find nostrae vitae (= de notre vie) acceptable as well.
 

LorioL

New Member
thank you so much for your answer,
I kinda like the opposition between the 2 lives and one love, even if i have to admit that it's quite bulky as you mentionned.
You made me want to learn latin again like when I was 14 years old.
Thank you again, for your answer that was so fast.
Have a nice day !
Carpe diem :D
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
I cannot help making a verse (classical metre: iambic senarius) :rolleyes1: :

Amoris radix lignum vitae sustinet. > The root of love sustains the tree of life*.
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* lignum vitae: cf. Vulgata Genesis 2:9 (KJV: the tree of life)
 
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