Things That Dawned on You Belatedly

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
The German word Tresor (safe/ bank vault) and the English word treasure come from Latin/Greek thesaurus (via French trésor).
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
How the hell did the r get in there?
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

Civis Illustris
I have only just noticed that signatures aren't visible on a phone. And I only did so because rothbard mentioned the topic in another context.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I only realized recently that the English word "diva" comes from the Latin diva.

The way I realized was that I was talking to my roommate about my cat Fia and what a "diva" she is (she really is, too; she would have made a perfect stand-in for Bastet back in Egyptian days...) Just then my other cat, Rumi, walked by, and my roommate looked at him and said something like, "Awww, you're a diva too, aren't you?"

"He would need to be a divus, though," I automatically thought, which was when it dawned on me.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I only realized just now that the English word "chaperone" is derived from the French chaperon, as in Le Petit Chaperon rouge (which was part of tonight's reading in my French textbook).
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I only realized quite recently (maybe two months ago) that the first part of the word "cosplay" was short for "costume".

I think it's because, for whatever reason, I pronounced it "coze-play" in my head, which sent me down the wrong track by making me think of "clothes", which has all the right letters in it and in the right order (though not adjacent to one another).
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
"Brand new" is like, newly from the brand.
 

KarlaUK

Active Member
Last week while listening to The Beatles it dawned on me that the opening lyrics to Lovely Rita are not: 'Lovely Rita meet her maid' but: Lovely Rita metre maid'. All these years.

I often make these mistakes with lyrics.
Meter maid
Not as in Carol Ann Duffy's poetry book, Metre Maid.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Two famous painters' names look like Latin verbs: Manet and Monet.
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
The blood is strong! However, I don't see the resemblance.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I think it's mainly in the eyes and the droop of the nose. I can see what they're talking about.
 
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