Things That Dawned on You Belatedly

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
'to drive' ie. 'to drive a car' or simply 'to drive' presumably derives from driving animals (in herds or drawing a vehicle).

Now every time someone says that they are going to drive somewhere, I'm going to imagine them standing on the motorway with a shepherd's crook urging the herd of cars along...
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
It's akin to German treiben. German also uses that word in connexion with cars, but in German, it's just the engine that does the driving, not the driver.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
A verdict is, etymologically, a true saying.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
"Reckless" has to be akin to "reckon", in which "reck" means wisdom or concern or thinking.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Probably concern/care, as in "I reck not of this or that".
 
A verdict is, etymologically, a true saying.
Do we know all the usages of veir and dit in old French? Did this usage of truth (veir) mean something slightly different to today's meaning in French, as in carrying extra weight and legitimacy. Just wondering on the word verdict and how it went from meaning truth to perhaps a judicial truth.

It appears to go through a dramatic change from Latin to old French.
 
Maybe veir meant an absolute truth but then all truths are absolute. Or are they? Can one truth out-truth another?

I bet the Greeks had a good go at this seemingly paradoxical proposition.
 
The root ver is really quite interesting as it appears to begin as a word for Spring but is now seen in words like very (truly), verify (make true), verdict (a truth in law came to unanimously and thus stated so) among others and all seemingly centred around truths of sorts.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
The Latin word verus is akin to the German word wahr and OE wær - meaning "true". wær went on to become very.
verdict and verify are Romance loans.
The Latin word ver meaning "spring" comes from a different root.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Very comes from OF verai. Ver meaning spring was from PIE wósr̥, ver meaning true comes from weh₁-. If very had come from wær it wouldn't have had a w~v change, it would've been "war", like "warlock" (truce-breaker).
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
It would've been cooler if there were some semantic connection between the two, like if the springtime were the true time, as the sun rules peacefully or something.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
I had this epiphany th'other day, and I had to run upstairs to tell my roommate (who was the last person to say it to me):

We have this stupid formulaic response in the States (it's probably supposed to be quaint country-talk) for when you're asking permission to call someone a nickname or such. The person says:
"Steven, eh? Can I call you 'Steve'?"
"Call me what(ever) you want(/like), just don't call me late for dinner."

Now, I always interpreted this latter part such that 'late' introduced an adjectival verb phrase functioning as an epithet, because we're talking about names after all. So it's as if to say, 'You could call me anything, like a liar, a thief, a fool, etc., but don't call me (someone who is) late for dinner (because nothing could be less true).' Which is why I thought it was funny, 'cause in my head this character doesn't mind being called far worse things, he just likes to eat & is prompt to do so.

But now I realize that 'late' is functioning adverbially(!), and of course 'call' is not = L nomino 'call a name' but rather = L arcesso 'call toward, summon'. As in, "I want to eat when it's hot." which to me is not funny in the least unless hokey and ironical (which it always is, in the north anyway).
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I had this epiphany th'other day, and I had to run upstairs to tell my roommate...
Likewise, I ran to my brother filled with surprise when I was risen suddenly to the knowledge that Volkswagen was the "People's wagon".
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
It gets pretty blurry imo, hard to know unless you compare cognates.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Minimalistic and clear.
 
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