Those who reside in the heart, truly never die

A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi,

I want to place a Latin inscription onto a tombstone.

"Those who reside in the heart, truly never die."

Thank You
 

Cato

Consularis
Let me say first that if this request is for a lost loved one, my sincere condolences.

My rather pedestrian suggestion: Numquam moriuntur, qui in corde manent. (think present indicative moriuntur is best here, as it makes it a statement of fact rather than a wish or prediction).

But I'm interested in what others would do with this phrase. I suspect there is a similar sentiment expressed in a classical or religious text (I can't think of one, but it's late) that you may prefer. If anyone can come up with it, please post.

Finally, please review the disclaimer at the head of this forum.
 

Iynx

Consularis
Re: Request For Memorial Translation

cool hand jay dixit:
Hi,

I want to place a Latin inscription onto a tombstone.

"Those who reside in the heart, truly never die."

Thank You
Perhaps:

Incolae cordis numquam vere moriuntur.

Doesn't really ring my bell. Anyone with a better idea?
 

casey anderson

New Member
Hi,

Want to get this as a tattoo in reference to my mother who passed. What does "pedestrian suggestion" and "doesn't ring my bell" mean? Are they both correct? Does anyone else have any insight? This thread is 9 years old. Thanks so much.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Hi,

I think by "pedestrian translation", Cato meant that he didn't spend an extensive amount of time on his translation, which means "those who remain in the heart never die".

Lynx wasn't too satisfied with his translation either ("doesn't ring my bell"), but it means "Inhabitants of the heart never truly die".

I'd suggest this: Quos valde amas numquam vere moriuntur - Those whom you deeply love never truly die.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Maybe I'm wrong, but I think his screenname is Iynx, like the nymph, not the animal.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Sometimes it's difficult to distinguish between a capital 'I' and lowercase 'l', so I may have indeed misread his name.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
In the screenname font the only distinguishing mark is a tiny rightward curve at the bottom of the lowercase L.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Ah, so it is "Iynx". Oops.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Apparently it's also the Greek and Latin name of the wryneck. I think I remember him saying he had an interest in birdwatching, so that may be the more likely source of his screenname.
 
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