"Though a man may reach for the stars, he may never possess them" etc.

Sieben7

New Member
I'm writing a story set in a dystopian future where the nobility is obsessed with old civilizations. One character quotes philosophers and poets like Homer, Aristotle, and Euripides. At first, I wanted him to simply quote them, but he became more important as the story progressed. I believe giving him some original lines would make him feel more organic. The character acts as a moral compass for the hero.

Online translators proved to be... terrible.

1) Though a man may reach for the stars, he may never possess them. (relates to the protagonist's desire to be loved by someone who left him)
2) He who asks for truths must be willing to accept them. (relates to the protagonist's refusal to see that he was deceived)
3) Rage burns even those it is meant to protect. (relates to the guilt felt by the protagonist after causing the death of someone dear to him)
4) Is it love if it causes such ruin? (Speaking of the destruction of a city to save his people from a potential war)
5) Losing one's chains does not make a man free. (speaking of the liberation of a people unwilling to govern themselves)
6) How can a man of violence teach peace? (relates to the protagonist's failure at remodeling society)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
1) Though a man may reach for the stars, he may never possess them. (relates to the protagonist's desire to be loved by someone who left him)
Cum possit quis astra appetere, tamen possidere numquam potest.
2) He who asks for truths must be willing to accept them. (relates to the protagonist's refusal to see that he was deceived)
Vera qui postulat, suscipere velit oportet.
3) Rage burns even those it is meant to protect. (relates to the guilt felt by the protagonist after causing the death of someone dear to him)
Ira urit et eos quos protegere vult, if you mean "rage" in the sense of "anger".
4) Is it love if it causes such ruin? (Speaking of the destruction of a city to save his people from a potential war)
Numquid is amor est, quo tanta conflatur ruina?
5) Losing one's chains does not make a man free. (speaking of the liberation of a people unwilling to govern themselves)
If "losing" isn't a mistake: catenae amissae non faciunt liberum.

If you meant "loosing": catenae solutae non faciunt liberum.
6) How can a man of violence teach peace? (relates to the protagonist's failure at remodeling society)
Qui potest vir violentus docere pacem?

 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Those writers and philosophers wrote in Greek :>
 

Sieben7

New Member
Those writers and philosophers wrote in Greek :>
They did, but the repository of quotes I use is all in latin with a translation next to it (a gift from a friend who studied latin)
The character in the story is based on him actually
 
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