Tattoo Though I falter; I will never give up

Charioce

New Member
How would the title phrase be translated if my intention was to mean that even though I go through hard times and sometimes want to quit I will never end up doing it?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Maybe Sum gnarus errandi, sed non deficiam.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
This may be closer:

Etsi labo, cedam numquam.
 

syntaxianus

Civis Illustris
I like this:

etsi offendo numquam dabo manus.

= although I falter I will never give up.

Offendere = to stumble, blunder, make a mistake, commit a fault; to commit an offence, to be offensive

manus dare or dedere, to give the hands to be bound; hence, in gen., to give up, yield, surrender : perpende, et, si tibi vera videntur, Dede manus, aut, si falsum est, accingere contra, Lucr. 2, 1043:
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I don't like offendo for falter.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
If you showed me your translation without any context, I would take it as "Although I am offensive [to other people]"; if I look at the Lewis & Short entry you quoted from, the examples there all involve the context of other people in relation to whom a mistake is made or some abstract thing as 'the law' (with the exception of the ecclesiastic example). That doesn't quite convey the meaning of the English word 'to falter' (except, maybe, the ecclesiastic take on it).
 

syntaxianus

Civis Illustris
If you showed me your translation without any context, I would take it as "Although I am offensive [to other people]"; if I look at the Lewis & Short entry you quoted from, the examples there all involve the context of other people in relation to whom a mistake is made or some abstract thing as 'the law' (with the exception of the ecclesiastic example). That doesn't quite convey the meaning of the English word 'to falter' (except, maybe, the ecclesiastic take on it).

I see. That is reasonable.

If "falter" is taken to mean "lose strength," then perhaps this is better:

etsi vires meae deficiunt, numquam desciscam (or numquam manus dabo).

Although my strength fails, never will I fall away (or give up).

Or using an ablative absolute:

et viribus deficientibus numquam desciscam.

Even with strength failing, never will I fall away.
 

J.M

Active Member
Greetings to all LatinD members,

Would this be correct:

VIRES MEAE NUNQUAM DEFICIUNT
My Strength Never Fails OR is deficient

Thank you,
J.M
 
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