Throw me to the wolves and I'll return leading the pack

sebbb

New Member
So ... I read a little and apparently turban means smth like crowd? I'm completely lost... Which translation should I finally choose? Which one is the most accurate?
Thank you all for your help!
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
So ... I read a little and apparently turban means smth like crowd? I'm completely lost... Which translation should I finally choose? Which one is the most accurate?
Thank you all for your help!
I personally like agrippa's first proposal:
How about

Obice me modo periculis: superior revertar. (> Just expose me to risks: I will return superior.)
unless you are not completelly satisfied with turba, you could consider agmen... agmen luporum (wolfpack).

[Exponite me ad lupos / Medio in luporum abreptus], [agmen ducens / dux agminis / alpha mas] redibo.
 
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LCF

Dr. Freud
truba luporum is attested

Silius Italicus

atque impasta trucis ululatus turba luporum
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
So ... I read a little and apparently turban means smth like crowd?
Latin is not the same as English.

pack in English can mean a group of matches or cards—this doesn't preclude it being used for wolves.

turba luporum is used in Silius Italicus. I can find no instance of agmen being used to mean a pack of wolves.

[edit Ninjad]
 

sebbb

New Member
I personally like agrippa's first proposal:


unless you are not completelly satisfied with turba, you could consider agmen... agmen luporum (wolfpack).

[Exponite me ad lupos / Medio in luporum abreptus], [agmen ducens / dux agminis / alpha mas] redibo.
Yes I like that one as well but it's mostly the same kind of expression. I would rather a literal translation of this phrase...
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
... I would rather a literal translation of this phrase...
Well, replace, if you like, "turbam" by "agmen" and write
"Conicite me ad lupos, agmen ducens redibo" (nearly consensus of opinion; nevertheless at your own risk).
You should come to a final decision.
:)
 
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scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Yes I like that one as well but it's mostly the same kind of expression. I would rather a literal translation of this phrase...
Except for the simplest of words, a word in one language generally does not have a one-to-one correspondence with a word in another language.

Here's Lewis and Short's definition for turba (edited):
I.a turmoil, hubbub, uproar, disorder, tumult, commotion, disturbance, of a crowd of people (syn. tumultus):
II. Transf.
A. In gen., for a disturbance made by a few or a single person, a brawl, confusion, disturbance, quarrel (in good prose rare):
B. Concr., a crowd, throng, multitude, mob; a band, train, troop, etc.
1. Of persons
2. Without the notion of a crowd or confusion, a great number, multitude:
3. Of other things, animate or inanimate, a crowd, throng, troop, multitude, number:
======================
Now here's their definition for agmen:
I. Lit.
A. In gen., a train, i. e. a collected multitude in motion or moving forwards; of things of any kind, but esp. (so most freq. in prose) of men or animals.
B. The train, procession, march, progress of an army:
II. Transf., concr., an army, and properly considered as in motion, on the march
B. Trop.
1. An army, troop, band, multitude:
2. March, movement
------------
What do you see as the difference between "crowd" and "pack?"
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Godmy's response avoids the issue of agmen/turba altogether:
"thrown to the wolves, I will return their leader"
It's not too much different from
Si me dederis ad lupos, dux eorum revertar = more or less literally, "If you throw me to the wolves, I will return as their leader."
projectus = "thrown," dederis is actually "give"
 
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sebbb

New Member
Just sharing my ideas (but you don't need to take it into consideration) - for others:

I thought of a nom. abs.(?) version for brevity: "Lupīs prōjectus, eōrum redībō dux!"
I really like that one : Lupīs prōjectus, eōrum redībō dux!

Is the spelling correct? It's for a tattoo so I really need to be sure of it :D

Thank you
 

sebbb

New Member
Godmy's response avoids the issue of agmen/turba altogether:
"thrown to the wolves, I will return their leader"
It's not too much different from
Si me dederis ad lupos, dux eorum revertar = more or less literally, "If you throw me to the wolves, I will return as their leader."
projectus = "thrown," dederis is actually "give"

So if I'm right we could also say : "Si me projectus ad lupos, dux eorum revertar" ?
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Si me projeceris ad lupos, dux eorum revertar
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
No, it isn't. "Throw me..." is imperative. :disapprove: In Latin: Obicite or Conicite me...
(The whole thing now looks like a never-ending story.)

"conicite": Thank you, Matthaeus.
 
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sebbb

New Member
No, it isn't. "Throw me..." is imperative. :disapprove: In Latin: Obicite or Conicete me...
(The whole thing now looks like a never-ending story.)
(The whole thing now looks like a never-ending story.) - you're right :)
`

So can we say "Conicite me ad lupos, dux eorum revertar" ?

Can we say it's final?
 
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