Thy Will be done Lord

Holly

New Member
I'm pretty keen to get a tattoo, with the Latin translation of: "Thy Will be done Lord, for thou art my Saviour." I also like the phrase: "With God's love, may my wings soar." I may change God's 'love' to God's 'grace' or something similar. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
There are some problems with the second sentence. Well principally, the wings should be in the nom. Now I come to the minor problem that I would prefer the verb 'evolare' because it's closer to 'soar' to differenciate it from 'to fly'.

My version would be: amore/gratia dei evolent alae meae : with god's love/grace may my wings soar/fly up...
 
There are some problems with the second sentence. Well principally, the wings should be in the nom. Now I come to the minor problem that I would prefer the verb 'evolare' because it's closer to 'soar' to differenciate it from 'to fly'.

My version would be: amore/gratia dei evolent alae meae : with god's love/grace may my wings soar/fly up...
Yes that would be better. I have no idea how I managed to stumble o_O into the accusative.
 

Jeff Priest

New Member
I am by no means an expert, but isn't Salvator more accurate than servator?
 

Jeff Priest

New Member
well, maybe accurate was the wrong adjective. while both mean the same, to me servator sounds more like someone who saved someone else from something, like being run over by a car. Salvator sounds to me more like someone who saved someone else from his own sins, and it also resembles the english word salvation. Being a deist, I do not really know what christians see in Christ, but I tend to believe it's the second type.

I don't know, it simply sounds better to me.
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
Salvator is almost certainly the more suitable choice here, given the presumably Christian context. It is, however, comparatively rare in classical Latin, where servator tends to supplant it in most contexts.

Many of us on the forum have a prejudice in favour of classical Latin, which it is sometimes difficult to defend, as here. Put it down to chronic indoctrination by well-meaning pedagogues.
 

Jeff Priest

New Member
<sigh>... For ages I have been trying to escape from the ages-old fight between mediævalists and classists, but alas! It seems like wherever I go, it goes as well.

Thanks for the clarification anyway.
 
Top