Translating dates of the year to Latin

Fred2016

New Member
Yes, but Idus, not IdVs. You could use ab urbe condita (a.d. 2004 = a.u.c. 2757) and the proper abbreviations to make it look more authentically like a Roman inscription: PR·ID·SEP·A·V·C·MMDCCLVII

Thank you for your reply.

I thought the Roman Alphabet lacked the U and they used the V instead. Then Idus would have been Idvs ?
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
I thought the Roman Alphabet lacked the U and they used the V instead. Then Idus would have been Idvs ?
In fact, the two were originally one in the same letter. When in lowercase, 'u' was written, 'V' in uppercase. Hence, Idus and IDVS, respectively.
 

Fred2016

New Member
Yes, but Idus, not IdVs. You could use ab urbe condita (a.d. 2004 = a.u.c. 2757) and the proper abbreviations to make it look more authentically like a Roman inscription: PR·ID·SEP·A·V·C·MMDCCLVII

Thank you! I like your suggestion.

Yes, but Idus, not IdVs. You could use ab urbe condita (a.d. 2004 = a.u.c. 2757) and the proper abbreviations to make it look more authentically like a Roman inscription: PR·ID·SEP·A·V·C·MMDCCLVII

Forgot to ask. So

so all written out it would read

Pridie Idus Septembris ab urbe condita MMDCCLVII

which translates into September 12, 2004 ?

Thanks again!!!
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Forgot to ask. So

so all written out it would read

Pridie Idus Septembris ab urbe condita MMDCCLVII

which translates into September 12, 2004 ?

Thanks again!!!
In that case you might want to add anno ('in the year') before ab urbe condita ('since the founding of the city', i.e. Rome) for clarity's sake. All together it means that it's the 2757th year since the founding of Rome.
 

Fred2016

New Member
In that case you might want to add anno ('in the year') before ab urbe condita ('since the founding of the city', i.e. Rome) for clarity's sake. All together it means that it's the 2757th year since the founding of Rome.
Hi,

So that only applies when it is all spelled out adding anno?

When abbreviated does it still remain

PR·ID·SEP·A·V·C·MMDCCLVII

or would it change?

Thanks again!
 

Fred2016

New Member
Hello,

I am still trying to figure this out. Just trying to make sure I got this right for obvious reasons.

So originally my post request was to translate this date: September 12th, 2004
and I came up with pridieIdVsSeptembrisMMIV trying to make it look as authentic as possible. In order words how would have the Romans had carved this into a monument.

So this is what was suggested here PR·ID·SEP·A·V·C·MMDCCLVII which I absolutely love.

But now I realized that the date doesn't require the "th" so it should have been September 12, 2004.

Taking this into consideration would that make a difference?

Thank you so much for your help here.



 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Hi,

So that only applies when it is all spelled out adding anno?

When abbreviated does it still remain

PR·ID·SEP·A·V·C·MMDCCLVII

or would it change?
Yeah, it can be left out with the abbreviated forms.
But now I realized that the date doesn't require the "th" so it should have been September 12, 2004.

Taking this into consideration would that make a difference?
I don't think it should, as Latin (unlike English) must always use an ordinal when indicating the year that something happened. Some clarification from you about what the date refers to might help, however.
 

Fred2016

New Member
Hello,

I am still trying to figure this out. Just trying to make sure I got this right for obvious reasons.

So originally my post request was to translate this date: September 12th, 2004
and I came up with pridieIdVsSeptembrisMMIV trying to make it look as authentic as possible. In order words how would have the Romans had carved this into a monument.

So this is what was suggested here PR·ID·SEP·A·V·C·MMDCCLVII which I absolutely love.

But now I realized that the date doesn't require the "th" so it should have been September 12, 2004.

Taking this into consideration would that make a difference?

Thank you so much for your help here.
 

Fred2016

New Member
Yeah, it can be left out with the abbreviated forms.


I don't think it should, as Latin (unlike English) must always use an ordinal when indicating the year that something happened. Some clarification from you about what the date refers to might help, however.


Its my sons birth date. I am just trying to make sure I am covering all the the aspects that will help with the translation. Thank you so much for your patience and understanding.

Thank you Ealdboc. I just went to look for it and found it. I am new and still figuring out how to navigate. It appears that when the post goes on the bottom of the thread and then other members replies build up on top.

Do you know by any chance if I can change my user name? It's kind of plain now that I think about it.

Thanks.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
'September 12th, 2004' and 'September 12, 2004' mean the exact same thing and thus the Latin translation won't change.

Btw, if you spelled out every word in Latin the whole expression would be Pridie Idus Septembris anno ab urbe condita bis millesimo septingentesimo quinquagesimo septimo.
 

fallingknife

New Member
I have seen several translations for March 15th (or the Ides of March) in latin. I was wondering if any of these are correct. Idus Martii, Idus Martiae, and Idibus Martiis.

So if someone asked me, "When was your sister born?", and I wanted to say "March 15" in latin, which would it be?
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
I have seen several translations for March 15th (or the Ides of March) in latin. I was wondering if any of these are correct. Idus Martii, Idus Martiae, and Idibus Martiis.

So if someone asked me, "When was your sister born?", and I wanted to say "March 15" in latin, which would it be?
Idibus Martiis would be the answer.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Thank you. Is there anything wrong with the other two forms? Or is Idibus Martiis the only acceptable form when relating to a birthdate for a girl?
Idibus Martiis is in the ablative case and means 'on the Ides of March'. Idus Martiae is in the nominative case, which wouldn't be proper in the context of your question. Idus Martii is a possible variant of Idus Martiae, but it's not the usual form in classical Latin.
 

fallingknife

New Member
Idibus Martiis is in the ablative case and means 'on the Ides of March'. Idus Martiae is in the nominative case, which wouldn't be proper in the context of your question. Idus Martii is a possible variant of Idus Martiae, but it's not the usual form in classical Latin.
Oh, I am glad I asked. I want to make an invitation for my sister's birthday. On the front of the card I just want to say "March 15" in latin. Would that change case?

Thank you again.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Oh, I am glad I asked. I want to make an invitation for my sister's birthday. On the front of the card I just want to say "March 15" in latin. Would that change case?

Thank you again.
You mean like "[It is] the Ides of March"?

Just to be clear, you do want it to be Roman themed, right? Because you can also just say "March 15" in the modern way without the whole Ides business.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Idus Martiae means 'the Ides of March' on it's own, but in answer to a question like 'When were you born?', the form Idibus Martibus would be required. (Idus Martii and Idibus Martii, respectively for Idus Martiae and Idibus Martibus, wouldn't exactly be incorrect either, but that isn't the standard way for them to be written in classical Latin.)
 
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