Translations for Medical App

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

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My reasoning for suggesting portio was that the concentration of a drug is basically the proportion of the drug to whatever substance it's diluted in, right?
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris

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Yes, I believe, it could work. I'm just curious about existing Neolatin vocabulary.
 

cinefactus

Censor

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Next dumb question. I need to be able to specify the side for body parts. The problem is that laeva is be OK with manu but not with bracchio. Could I use something like sinistrorsum?

How would you distinguish the upper arm from the lower arm?
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης

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Proximalis and distalis come to mind. Admittedly, mainly because 'proximal' and 'distal' are already used in English in that sense.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

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Next dumb question. I need to be able to specify the side for body parts. The problem is that laeva is be OK with manu but not with bracchio. Could I use something like sinistrorsum?
Maybe, but is there something to prevent you from using the adjectives laevus/sinister and dexter in agreement with the name of whatever body part you're talking about at the time?
How would you distinguish the upper arm from the lower arm?
In classical Latin there's lacertus for the upper arm and bracchium for the lower arm, but the potential problem is that these words often weren't used in a very precise way — both could mean just the whole arm as well.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

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Actually, does proximalis have any existence away from Medical Latin, or did the butchers develop it from English 'proximal'?
 

scrabulista

Consul

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cinefactus

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Maybe, but is there something to prevent you from using the adjectives laevus/sinister and dexter in agreement with the name of whatever body part you're talking about at the time?
They are different fields and the localization software wouldn't cope with it. I would have to write something custom to deal with it. Another way around it would just be to have sin. and dex.

In classical Latin there's lacertus for the upper arm
I looked at this, but I would think shoulder if I saw lacertus.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης

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Actually, does proximalis have any existence away from Medical Latin, or did the butchers develop it from English 'proximal'?
Unsurprisingly, L&S knows nothing of it, but I have found misericordia proximalis from some Spanish neolatinist, or rather the internet has. Of course, that might be just him.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

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I looked at this, but I would think shoulder if I saw lacertus.
Hm, in classical Latin the word for shoulder was (h)umerus, though it could also mean the humerus.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

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They are different fields and the localization software wouldn't cope with it. I would have to write something custom to deal with it. Another way around it would just be to have sin. and dex.
I guess you could work around this with ad dextram and ad sinistram, or in parte dextra and in parte sinistra, or something like that.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης

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Interviewer: 'So, Dr Cinefactus, how do you unwind after a long day at the hospital? Any hobbies?'

Cinefactus: 'At the moment I'm working on a Latin app for medical terminology. It's quite a challenge; for example, Latin is an inflected language, which confuses computers.'

Interviewer: 'And who uses this, um, infected language? Is this for immigrants who don't speak English?'

Cinefactus: 'No, we use English, sort of, in the hospital. It would make things complicated otherwise. But if a Roman from Cicero's time were suddenly reincarnated among us, it would be the sort of thing they'd appreciate.'

Interviewer: 'I see. And is this something the medical profession is expecting to happen in the near future?'

Cinefactus: 'To be honest, no. But we've certainly learnt from recent events that the unexpected can happen. And if it does, this is the one place that will be ready for it!'
 
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cinefactus

Censor

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I would think "arm".
I looked back at the Aeneid and I must have been misreading it the whole time. What would you use for shoulder? I can't use humerus, as this is the name of the bone of the upper arm in medicine.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris

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I looked back at the Aeneid and I must have been misreading it the whole time. What would you use for shoulder? I can't use humerus, as this is the name of the bone of the upper arm in medicine.
... but that's the word for shoulder.
 

cinefactus

Censor

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Here is another one:
When we put local anaesthetic around a nerve we call it a block, because it blocks nerve transmission. What do you think about obseptum?
Saphenous Nerve Block: N. Saphenus Obseptus? Obseptum N. Sapheni?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

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Is obseptum attested as a noun? I know s(a)eptum is, but it's more like an enclosure.

Obex comes to mind.
 
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