Translations for Medical App

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Yes, but in classical Latin perdo more often refers to losing through one's own fault
It would certainly be someone's fault ;)
I will keep amissus.

Another one is output—the opposite to input. Usually the sum of blood loss, and urine output, but can be other secretions as well. Could we use effusiones for this do you think, with effusio urinae for urine output?
 

rothbard

Quaestor
Staff member
Next questions
Blood loss: Effusio Sanguinis? It seems to have a legal meaning of referring to the punishment imposed for the shedding of blood
Venous cannula: cannula venosa looks obvious and would go with cannula arteriosa, but does it look like a "veiny cannula" do you think?
fasting (solids) hora cibo abstinendi?
This book seems to contain a lot information on Latin medical terms. From p. 229:

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Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Isn't the actual term fasting ieiunium?

Another one is output—the opposite to input. Usually the sum of blood loss, and urine output, but can be other secretions as well. Could we use effusiones for this do you think, with effusio urinae for urine output?
Yes. According to my dictionary, Jerome actually used that term (can't find the text online, though).
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Isn't the actual term fasting ieiunium?
Can we use that for Fasting (Solids) do you think?

the effusio in question appears to be a sign of something going wrong rather than normal urination
That is the normal meaning of effusion in medical English.

Unfortunately I couldn't see enough in the preview of Medical Latin in the Roman Empire to see if it would be helpful :(

This one looks promising though.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
In what context, where in the app does this word "output" appear exactly? Is it absolutely necessary to have one word for it, or would there be a way to put different words in different places in the app where this word appears?
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
What do you think for Notes & Risks, (Risks being risks eplained)?
Notes: Adnotationes?
Risks: Pericula?
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
In what context, where in the app does this word "output" appear exactly? Is it absolutely necessary to have one word for it, or would there be a way to put different words in different places in the app where this word appears?
I found emissio in the book Rothbard suggested, which covers involuntary loss of fluids.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
From p.177 it looks like urina can also be used for urine output :) Doesn't solve the problem of output in general though.
Would humores work?
The four humors = blood, phlegm, choler, melancholia.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Lol, the problem is that we need different words...
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Fasting is the same word for solids and liquids in English as well.
But I suppose you need to be more precise in medicine.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I suppose we could have ieiunium cibi and ieiunium liquoris or something like that.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
But actually, do you have any examples where ieiunium is used of abstience from liquids? I can only see it referring to abstinence from food.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I guess it could still be OK, anyway, with liquoris making it clear enough what is meant.
 
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