Underdog.

Seanlfc

New Member
What is the Latin translation of the word underdog, please?
I want to use it as an inspirational tattoo. Obviously in a masculine sense.
Any help would be greatly appreciated...
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
I was thinking of tenissime tenuissime aestimatus.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I think you meant tenuissime. It seems a somewhat strange wording, though.

There's no straightforward Latin translation for "underdog". Anything we might come up with will be an approximation.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
@Pacifica thanks, I missed the "u" - I supported my translation on CCELD (entry for "underrate")

I forgot "underdog" has two meanings:

I guess the OP has to provide info about context.
1) a person or group of people with less power, money, etc. than the rest of society - inferior / humilis / plebeius / contemptus
2) the weaker of two competitors, or anyone not expected to win a competition: "inconspicuus victor"???
 

Seanlfc

New Member
Hey thanks for your replies. I wasn't aware that there isn't a literal translation of the word underdog in Latin so I have learned something already. So in that case I guess I'm looking for something appeals to our capacity to never give up in the face of adversity and overwhelming odds. I hope that helps.
 
I think you meant tenuissime. It seems a somewhat strange wording, though.

There's no straightforward Latin translation for "underdog". Anything we might come up with will be an approximation.
But is there a term for what we call today an underdog? Just thinking of Generals, games, the political arena, etc.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
But is there a term for what we call today an underdog? Just thinking of Generals, games, the political arena, etc.

David Goliath(um)* percutiens
David Goliath(o)* praevalens
[minor/parvus] [maiorem/grandem] petens - [smaller/small] taking on the [bigger/big]

*couldn't find declesnion of noun Goliath - merely assumption.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Qui videar impar, victor evadam = "Though I seem no match, I will turn out the winner."
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Verba Pacificae in formam iambici senarii redegi:

Impar qui videar, victor evadam tamen.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Verba Pacificae in formam iambici senarii redegi:
Let's translate this for the OP's benefit, since he doesn't know Latin. ;)

Agrippa has modified my sentence slightly (though the meaning doesn't change) so as to make it fit into a line of verse (an iambic senarius, a form of meter).
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Let's translate this for the OP's benefit, since he doesn't know Latin. ...
Thank you very much! Please excuse me for writing Latin without translation. 'The force of habit.':pray:
 

Seanlfc

New Member
Really appreciate your help with this everyone. But due to it not being something easily translated, how about this one "I go again" from the viewpoint of not resting on ones laurels. Could this be an easier one to translate perhaps?
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
How about
"semper pergo / procedo / progredior", > I always proceed (besides, there is a rather worn-out cliché "semper porro" > always forward),
"numquam iners / desidiosus / languidus" > never inactive,
and so forth...
 
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