Vocabulary Lists for Horace and Ovid

Lysandra

Canis
Saluete omnes!

I have a final exam for Latin later this month, and I'm trying to learn all the relevant vocabulary for the texts. I found an excellent list for both Horace's Odes Book 1 and Ovid's Amores Book 1, but I'm still looking for lists for the rest of the Odes and the Amores. I was wondering if anyone here knows of where I could find them.

Gratias uobis ago!! :)
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

Civis Illustris
I don't, but don't lists more or less write themselves nowadays? If you simply keep a record of every word you have to look up when reading the text, a computer will organise it in seconds according to any criteria you might desire, and add whatever additional information you might want, either now or at some future point. Apart from all the optional pictures, flashing text and whatever else is in fashion.
 

Lysandra

Canis
I don't, but don't lists more or less write themselves nowadays? If you simply keep a record of every word you have to look up when reading the text, a computer will organise it in seconds according to any criteria you might desire, and add whatever additional information you might want, either now or at some future point. Apart from all the optional pictures, flashing text and whatever else is in fashion.

Yes, and I do that for all the specific texts I read during the semester using either on Quizlet or Memrise. However, I'm trying to learn the vocabulary for the unseen texts. I know that most of the unseens on the exam will come from the Odes or Amores. I'm translating the poems I think are most likely, but of course I can't read every poem before the exam so I'd just like to be aware of the most difficult vocabulary.
 

Lysandra

Canis
Thanks. Those are the two lists I've found already--I was wondering if there was anything else like that for the rest of the Odes and Amores. But I might be going about it the wrong way. My lecturer always gives us a list of unseen vocabulary for the exam, but he cancelled our final class and hasn't been heard from since. I don't even know the structure of the exam. In previous years, the exam has ranged from just translations to grammar, scansion and historical/cultural questions. So I don't really know what I should be focusing my time on. Any advice?
 

AoM

nulli numeri
I'd email the professor asking him those questions. He didn't say anything about it when he cancelled that last class?
 

Lysandra

Canis
Of course, I emailed the lecturer! And I left him a message on Skype! Plus I had another student write him! The last thing he said was to email him if we had any questions, but that was a week ago and now he's gone AWOL. :confused:
 

AoM

nulli numeri
Well, that seems unprofessional on his part.

When's the exam and will he be there to proctor it?
 

Lysandra

Canis
The exam is on the 26th. I'm a distance student so he will only be proctoring it if I take it at the university. In the past I've taken the exams at whatever testing centre has been closest to me, but I plan to actually go to the university this time.
 

Lysandra

Canis
Well, when he's actually present, he's great. We have the most hilarious discussions in class. But it's not the first time he's disappeared like this.
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
You can generate vocabulary lists on Perseus but there are severe limitations.

I can't read every poem before the exam so I'd just like to be aware of the most difficult vocabulary.

That isn't necessarily true: you have 12 days and there are only about 50 poems in the Amores and they're not that long; the Odes are rather longer (but not by that much). If you have nothing else to do in the next week you might possibly manage it. I guess it does depend on your level of Latin though.

Also I suspect that the most difficult vocabulary will be highly context-specific. A brief look at my notes at Odes 3 suggests that the main sticking points were words like 'rosemary', 'wicker basket', 'hoop' which are fairly rare and easier to remember in the context of individual poems. It does depend on your vocabulary level, though.
 

Lysandra

Canis
That isn't necessarily true: you have 12 days and there are only about 50 poems in the Amores and they're not that long; the Odes are rather longer (but not by that much). If you have nothing else to do in the next week you might possibly manage it. I guess it does depend on your level of Latin though.

Also I suspect that the most difficult vocabulary will be highly context-specific. A brief look at my notes at Odes 3 suggests that the main sticking points were words like 'rosemary', 'wicker basket', 'hoop' which are fairly rare and easier to remember in the context of individual poems. It does depend on your vocabulary level, though.
The unseens could also include poems from Catullus and Propertius. Unfortunately, I can't devote the whole 12 days to studying Latin as I also have a take-home exam for another unit to complete. I'll be finished with it on Sunday morning so I'll have about 8 days to dedicate to Latin alone. My lecturer says he plans to send out an unseen vocab list to us which will be good, but it hasn't happened yet. In the meantime, I've planned to meet up with at least one of my classmates next week and do some review together.
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
The unseens could also include poems from Catullus and Propertius. Unfortunately, I can't devote the whole 12 days to studying Latin as I also have a take-home exam for another unit to complete. I'll be finished with it on Sunday morning so I'll have about 8 days to dedicate to Latin alone. My lecturer says he plans to send out an unseen vocab list to us which will be good, but it hasn't happened yet. In the meantime, I've planned to meet up with at least one of my classmates next week and do some review together.
Yes, I think the whole of Catullus and Propertius as well would be pushing it!

I personally find reading Latin text a better way to improve than vocabulary lists, but this is the sort of thing which varies from person to person.
 

Lysandra

Canis
I personally find reading Latin text a better way to improve than vocabulary lists, but this is the sort of thing which varies from person to person.
You're probably right. I might just pick some of the most likely poems from each author and give them a read through.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
I personally find reading Latin text a better way to improve than vocabulary lists, but this is the sort of thing which varies from person to person.
I agree.
 
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