Inspirational Wanderer, kommst du nach Sparta....

Laurentius

Man of Culture
The clause seems likely to be independent from the indirect speech but I'm not entirely sure. Is that how you tend to understand the German — that the equivalent of sicut lex mandavit is a comment by the speaker rather than part of what the addressee is meant to report?
Do you speak German too?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris

Der, die, das.
Wer, wie, was?
Wieso, weshalb, warum?
Wer nicht fragt, bleibt dumm.
Tausend tolle Sachen, die gibt es überall zu seh'n.
Manchmal muss man fragen, um sie zu versteh'n.

The, the, the.
Who, how, what?
Why, wherefore, for which reason?
Those who don't ask will remain ignorant.
A thousand great things can be seen everywhere.
Sometimes you have to ask in order to understand them.
 

Issacus Divus

ᛋᚢᚾᚢ ᚱᛖᛟᚱᛞᚲᚤᚾᛁᚾᚷᚨᛋ
I appreciate it anyway!
 

J.M

Active Member
Oh, J.M has deleted his post :p
Greetings,
I did, I had just realized that the question wasn't being directed to me,
J.M
 

J.M

Active Member

Der, die, das.
Wer, wie, was?
Wieso, weshalb, warum?
Wer nicht fragt, bleibt dumm.
Tausend tolle Sachen, die gibt es überall zu seh'n.
Manchmal muss man fragen, um sie zu versteh'n.

The, the, the.
Who, how, what?
Why, wherefore, for which reason?
Those who don't ask will remain ignorant.
A thousand great things can be seen everywhere.
Sometimes you have to ask in order to understand them.
Greetings,

What a refreshing way to start the day! The Der, die, das song energised me!

Thank you Bitmap!,
J.M
 

Godmy

A Monkey
I must say though, I had a totally nerd moment when I heard this quote in the comic book adaption 300 (2006) movie referenced quite nicely:

(jump to 1:00 )

... also it gained a meaning to me as I grew up since the first time I saw the movie in my early teenage hood - but later after I learnt Latin and some Greek.

Tonight, I've seen the movie again, I love it! It's a visual masterpiece of cinematography and, at least for the big screen, it made the ancient Greece (Sparta in particular) cool again for the 21st century (yeah, some people still tend to complain how inaccurate it is, that Xerxes had no undead monsters and giants, right, well, it's a comic book adaptation, but that doesn't matter, it conveys the core of the Greco-Persian war history still very well, makes new people interested in it)...


There was btw. also the (translation by Cicero) 'pergite animo forti, Lacedaemonii, hodie apud inferos fortasse cenabimus.'


 
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