We have conquered the tyrants before, and so shall will do it again.

M.A.

New Member
Salve I'm new here.
I'm writing a political novel its events take place in Sicily. I know little about Latin, so I hope you can help me in translating this to Latin "We have conquered the tyrants before, and so shall will do it again."

Thanks in advance.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
I was thinking of:
[Olim/ tunc] tyrannos vicimus, nunc quoque vincemus - we defeated the tyrants [once/ then], now we shall also win.
 
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Agrippa

Civis Illustris
How about a classical distich:

Tempore praeterito reges devicimus omnes,
Tempore venturo rursus agemus idem.


(Word for word:
In the time past we conquered completely all tyrants (NB in the time of the Roman republic rex meant tyrannus)
In the time to come we shall do the same again.)
 
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Agrippa

Civis Illustris
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The distinction between kings (reges) and tyrants (tyrannos) might still be important. I know that Roman republicans viewed all kings as tyrants, but it's still not quite the same in all contexts.

In prose, you could say tyrannos vicimus ante, et iterum vincemus.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Revised my distich, now using tyrannos:

Tempore praeterito superavimus usque tyrannos:
Tempore venturo rursus agemus idem.


In the time past we conquered continuously the tyrants
In the time to come we shall do the same again.
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
If you want idiomatic, there's sic semper tyrannis (thus always to tyrants; motto of Virginia)
 
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