"We have just come from my house."

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
Good day!
A quick little question today: "We have just come from my house." = ā domū meā modo vēnimus, or ā domū meō modo vēnimus? If you are asking if this is a question of case again, you are primarily right. I feel certain that I want to use meā here, as opposed to meō, since possessive pronoun meus must be treated as a derivative adjective and so must agree with domus, which is a feminine noun, but I just wanted to check my thinking. Also, am I using the proper adverb, modo, here, and is the adverb in the correct grammatical position? Thanks much.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I feel certain that I want to use meā here, as opposed to meō, since possessive pronoun meus must be treated as a derivative adjective and so must agree with domus, which is a feminine noun, but I just wanted to check my thinking.
That is correct.
Also, am I using the proper adverb, modo, here,
Yes.
and is the adverb in the correct grammatical position?
Several positions are possible. Yours is fine.

There are however a couple of other problems with you translation: domus is one of those few common nouns that usually don't take prepositions and are constructed in the locative when a location is meant, in the bare accusative when a motion toward is meant, and in the bare ablative when a motion from is meant. This is how it works when the house denotes someone's home rather than a mere physical building. Domus also has a mixed declension and usually has an ablative domo.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
...domus is one of those few common nouns that usually don't take prepositions and are constructed...in the bare ablative when a motion from is meant. This is how it works when the house denotes someone's home rather than a mere physical building.
May I assume that by "bare ablative", you mean sans preposition?
Domus also has a mixed declension and usually has an ablative domo.
Yes, I noted that domus has ablative forms: domō and domū, and the dative has even more options: domuī , domō, and domū, but haven't yet learned the circumstances under which each of these is used. I also note that domus has a locative case. Is there a term for such nouns which include the locative?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
in the bare accusative when a motion toward is meant
Fun fact: English does the same with the word "home" -- you say "I'm going home" rather than "I'm going to my home."
This is the only case I can think of in which English has preserved an accusative of motion. German does the same with the word "Heim"; I'm not sure if German has other examples, but I think I can't think of any.
 
Fun fact: English does the same with the word "home" -- you say "I'm going home" rather than "I'm going to my home."
This is the only case I can think of in which English has preserved an accusative of motion. German does the same with the word "Heim"; I'm not sure if German has other examples, but I think I can't think of any.
It appears that Old English has already had the etymon of home — hām — analyzed as an adverb. If German has the same thing, can we perhaps assume this construction at Proto Germanic or maybe even PIE if Latin is also exhibiting this trend (I assume that you can do the same for Ancient Greek, although I’m more inclined to use νοστέω just for the motion of coming home)?
 
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