What are you reading?

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
You had me at Erasmus.

I got a couple things goin' (another request that you people make a goodreads acct, even if you never use it, so at the very least I can see what you're up to in the world of letters), but I still have to add something Greek or Latin. Getting rustier by the minute. I'm thinking one of the tragedians whose OCTs I just recovered from folks' house(Aeschylus & Euripides). Or if I'm feeling drunk bold enough, maybe a reprisal of ol' Πίνδαρος (i.e. Πινδάρω).
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
I'm attempting to improve my German through reading children's novels. Currently on p168 of Cornelia Funke's Tintenherz.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
I'm attempting to refresh and improve my poor French. Currently on chapter 3 of Valérie Demouy, Alan Moys, Colloquial French
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Bonne chance!
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Je ne sais pas le français mais je devais l'étudier en école. J'ai oublié beaucoup.
 
Gay rights movement from the 70s through to the early 80s, mainly centred on New York and San Francisco. Aids too and gay bath houses of the late 70s.

Began with a Freddie Mercury bio then on to starting Patient Zero before stopping to start The Band played On.
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
I'm reading Unknown Pleasures: Inside Joy Division, written by the band's bassist Peter Hook.
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
Gay rights movement from the 70s through to the early 80s, mainly centred on New York and San Francisco. Aids too and gay bath houses of the late 70s.

Began with a Freddie Mercury bio then on to starting Patient Zero before stopping to start The Band played On.
Sounds pretty interesting.
 
Sounds pretty interesting.
It is. If you're clueless like me on these issues, And The Band Played On sort of picks up after the murder of Harvey Milk and begins an interesting political, medical and social inquiry into the aids epidemic and the gay rights movement of America.
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
Just came back with a gargantuan score from the used book place, and there's some quality stuff here. Most notably:
I'm looking at the foreign language section as I always do, never really expecting to find anything special, but my ol' eyeball alights on a particular item and I actually said aloud 'Holy hell!' (a tad blasphemous) 'cause there was a genuine Vulgate on the shelf. I've been after one of these things for years (not like I couldn't have just ordered it online). And now I'm sittin' here with the trifecta in my lap, and I realize something nifty: the word for 'light' is masc. in Hebrew, fem. in Latin, and neuter in Greek. Oy vey!
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
I also got de Sade, more Eco, more Joyce, a Spanish copy of Don Quixote, The Death of Ivan Ilych, a Japanese dictionary... I'm losing my breath.

I went in there thinking to spend maybe 50 bucks, wound up tripling the sum but I'll be set for quite a while.
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
I'm never letting you into my house!
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
A right shame! For now I have no hope of layin' hands on yer pot o' gold.
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Pots of gold. The collection is spread over three rooms at this point. I might let you in but only if you consent to being searched on the way out.
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
Fair enough. At that juncture I'll have a tenner ready for you.
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
me dixit:
there was a genuine Vulgate on the shelf
Don't get me wrong: that Jerome was a helluva guy, but as I flip through this thing I begin to wonder at the validity of some of his best guesses.
Take Ezra II 2, 13, which has:
et egressus sum... ad portam Stercoris.

Now, I know the word can mean more generally like 'dross' or something, but the Hebrew is clearly related to either the word for 'sweep' or 'set (over a fire)', such that it could mean 'sweepings/ash-pile'. I certainly don't know enough to second-guess Jerome, or the learned folkd who wrote the Septuagint, but it seems there has to be a word less, well, evocative than stercus, or at least more in line with what precedes (that is, the fontem Draconis, if the understood Draco is the fiery Assyro-Babylonian version) and follows (the wall broken & gates of Jerusalem consumed with fire).
 
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