What cases does vocare take?

MCYLatin

New Member
I've run into a Latin sentence/question in First Year Henle and wanted to confirm something. In Reading 18, it says the legatus asks a Gallic captive Quem prīncipem et ducem vocātis? and the translation in the key says Whom do you call chief and leader? The captive's response is Ambiorīgem et Catuvulcum. So would the full sentence response be
Ambiorīgem et Catuvulcum principem et ducem vocāmus? My main question is, in cases where call is used like "I called Jack my sidekick," are both objects in accusative case?
Thanks for any clarification!
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
So would the full sentence response be
Ambiorīgem et Catuvulcum principem et ducem vocāmus?
Yes, and ...

My main question is, in cases where call is used like "I called Jack my sidekick," are both objects in accusative case?
Thanks for any clarification!

Yes.
 

john abshire

Active Member
I've run into a Latin sentence/question in First Year Henle and wanted to confirm something. In Reading 18, it says the legatus asks a Gallic captive Quem prīncipem et ducem vocātis? and the translation in the key says Whom do you call chief and leader? The captive's response is Ambiorīgem et Catuvulcum. So would the full sentence response be
Ambiorīgem et Catuvulcum principem et ducem vocāmus? My main question is, in cases where call is used like "I called Jack my sidekick," are both objects in accusative case?
Thanks for any clarification!
I think the use of voco for "call" here is wrong. [and there is an error in the book.]
it should be appello, -are.
I have;
appello, -are, =to name, entitle, to call by name
voco, -are,= to call upon, invoke, or summon

Quem prīncipem et ducem appellātis? Whom do you call chief and leader?
 
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