Whatever happens, happens

jcypher36

New Member
Can someone help me with translating that phrase? I would also like to know if that's a popular quote, like Carpe Diem or Semper Fi.

Thanks!
 

Andy

Civis Illustris
Well, Plautus has the famous "Factum est illud, fieri infectum non potest".

Basically meaning: "That is done, it cannot be made undone"
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
If you are looking for something like, "What is fated will occur", you could try the following proverb:
ducunt volentem fata, nolentem trahunt
Fate leads the willing, and drags the unwilling.

or I would hazard a translation such as
fatum numquam falletur
(Fate is never cheated)

I am not an expert, but I think there are some Scandinavian proverbs along this line too, eg

en engi má við sköpum vinna.
but no one can withstand his fate.


If you are looking for something like, "I will accept whatever comes to pass", you could try Matthew 6:34
nolite esse solliciti in crastinum
take no thought for the morrow...
 

Andy

Civis Illustris
"Nolite ergo esse solliciti in crastinum crastinus enim dies sollicitus erit sibi ipse"
Therefore refuse to be anxious for the morrow, for the morrow will be worried for itself.

I like that! Thanks for bringing it up!
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Another couple of quotes I found...
Fata viam invenient: the Fates will find a way (Virgil)

quid vesper ferat, incertum est: what the evening may bring is unknown (Livy)
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Cinefactus: "fatum numquam falletur" is future tense; is this warranted? Because you translated it as present tense.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
quemquem me facis dixit:
Cinefactus: "fatum numquam falletur" is future tense; is this warranted? Because you translated it as present tense.
Thanks for spotting that. I meant to type "fatum numquam fallitur", although I suppose the future would also make sense...
 

jcypher36

New Member
Thanks for all your replies. I'm looking for a direct translation though. I saw it somewhere once and I can't find it anymore... :doh:
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Well in Latin, repeating a verb just sounds silly, largely because there were no commas in real Latin. That's why we translate it in ways that Latin would actually use. Doing "quicquid accidit, accidit" would be a direct translation but it just makes you look foolish to those who know what you're talking about.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I guess you could try:
accidat quicquid accidet. This would mean, "Let whataver will happen, happen". There might be some subtle other meanings that I have missed though.

Or perhaps
fiat quicquid accidet
Let whatever will happen be done
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Accideturum accidat, perhaps?
Not sure if I spelled the first word correctly.
 
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