Why are sales of the boxes (containers) so slow (poor, disappointing, low)?

Lysandra

Canis
Not sure exactly what you mean here. Are you trying to translate the line in the thread title? There is a Latin word for "cookie"--it's "crustulum".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
A possibility might be:

Cur tam paucae pyxides veneunt? (Literally "Why are so few boxes selling?")
 

Bbabbaloo

New Member
Thanks Pacifica and Lysandra. And since there is surprisingly a word for cookie (!), I'd want to insert that: and ask "Why are so few cookie boxes selling?"
 

Lysandra

Canis
Thanks Pacifica and Lysandra. And since there is surprisingly a word for cookie (!), I'd want to insert that: and ask "Why are so few cookie boxes selling?"
Perhaps this: Cur tam paucae pyxides crustulorum ueneunt?
"Crustulum" literally means "a little cake or pastry", but I've heard it in the sense of "cookie" as well.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Of course the Romans had no cookies as we know them, but since a cookie is a sort of little cake or pastry, we can use that word even if it isn't so specific.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Is it? I thought it was just a biscuit.
Well, yes. But aren't biscuits pastries, kind of? When you consider the ingredients, it's similar. In any case, I guess pastries were the closest things Romans had to biscuits.
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
Is there a word closer to 'biscuit'? Smith's dictionary has buccellátum, but that apparently has a very specific connotation (a hard biscuit used as soldiers' rations). An adjectival form is apparently used in the Medecina Plinii but I can't find the text on the internet.
 

Bbabbaloo

New Member
Wow, interesting discussion! I'm almost done with my website "San Diego Data Queen", and after I go live, I'll send the link so you all can see how I used the Latin. How would one translate "Data Queen"?
 

Lysandra

Canis
Wow, interesting discussion! I'm almost done with my website "San Diego Data Queen", and after I go live, I'll send the link so you all can see how I used the Latin. How would one translate "Data Queen"?
Perhaps regina datorum.
 

Bbabbaloo

New Member
nThanks. So if I wanted to say "San Diego Data Queen does the hard part so you don't have to", would it be "San Diego Regina Datorum opera ardua facimus ne vobis necesse sit." Thanks again!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
And the Latin form of San Diego would be Sancti Didaci.

Of course this use of datorum in the sense of "data" is Neo-Latin rather than classical.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
There is no word for it in classical Latin. One would have to use some phrase.
 

Lysandra

Canis
Of course the Romans had no cookies as we know them, but since a cookie is a sort of little cake or pastry, we can use that word even if it isn't so specific.
Is there a word closer to 'biscuit'? Smith's dictionary has buccellátum, but that apparently has a very specific connotation (a hard biscuit used as soldiers' rations). An adjectival form is apparently used in the Medecina Plinii but I can't find the text on the internet.
By the way, if anyone is interested, here are some reconstructed recipes of what the traditional crustulum and bucellatum might have looked like. My Latin teacher last semester always liked to show us recipes whenever we came across a type of Roman food in our reading.

http://pass-the-garum.blogspot.com.au/2014/10/bucellatum-roman-army-hardtack.html
http://zeitgeist.exarc.net/manuals/cooking-crustulum-and-dulcia-domestica-roman
 

Bbabbaloo

New Member
It's sunny here today in Sancti Didaci! Instead of data, one could substitute information. That's probably not neo-Latin.
 

Lysandra

Canis
It's sunny here today in Sancti Didaci! Instead of data, one could substitute information. That's probably not neo-Latin.
I don't think information is really any easier to translate. Between the two dictionaries I've looked at, there's about seven translations for it and none are ideal. Anyway, there's nothing wrong with using Neo-Latin.
 
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