Why did you choose to learn Latin?

freznow

New Member
At my middle school, you had to take Latin in 6th grade. It's been just the greatest thing! I may have been a bit iffy on whether or not I should take it if they had offered greek or russian, but all they had otherwise was Spanish and French - and goodness knows I wouldn't be mundane enough to take one of those [no offense to those that do..]) But Latin was so much fun and I learned so much, I'm not much of a speaker anyways, and I was glad not to have to do so in Latin whereas when I had a year of French we had to do a lot of that. Latin rules all!
 

thiv3000

New Member
It was compulsory to take Latin in year 8 and 9. But by the time I got to year 10, it was amazing to know that I would be able to understand amazing historical figures if I continued to study it. So I did! And I do not regret it. :)
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
cepasaccus dixit:
My reason to learn Latin in earnest because I realized how bad the translations were, e. g. Catullus. I am agnostic, but in the translated bible not even the first sentence is correct. ("In the beginning was the word ..." Word? What word?) My focus is on the Latin of the Romans, but reading Stroh's book waked my interested for other Latin literature. So I would now like to read e. g. Erasmus, but I am not good enough yet, although reading Asterix is slow, but I manage to do. And having to ignore all these people not understanding why I learn Latin is not so difficult.
I know this post is actually rather old, but I'd like to refute a couple of things here. To start, being able to read Latin is a fairly minor aid in deep Biblical study. This is because neither the Old nor the New Testament was originally written in Latin; the former was written in Hebrew, the latter in Greek. The advantage of reading it in Latin (as opposed to the vast majority of other languages) is that it is related to Greek more than most other languages, and so the translations tend to be closer to the original than those for other languages. But even that is rather small; it is much better to attempt to read in the originals for both if one is seeking a proper reading.

Second, that translation is, in fact, correct. Having read that particular snippet of the original New Testament (I've read the first 34 verses of John's Prologue) it is in fact an enigmatic passage even in the original.

In other cases, such as Catullus, I agree with you entirely.
 

cepasaccus

Civis Illustris
I did not learn greek in any way, but using the "word" meaning instead of the "ratio, reasoning" meaning of "logos" is IMO not a good choice.
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
cepasaccus dixit:
I did not learn greek in any way, but using the "word" meaning instead of the "ratio, reasoning" meaning of "logos" is IMO not a good choice.
Really? Hmm, I never knew of that meaning of λογος; maybe my book (Greek Without Grief by Warren F. Dicharry) is excessively based in the translations of the past, which relied fairly heavily on the Vulgate for support (since English is more closely tied to Latin than to Greek). But then how do you explain "και θεος ην ο λογος" (kai theos en ho logos, roughly) in context? A shift from the reasoning meaning to the word meaning?
 

cepasaccus

Civis Illustris
I can't explain, but the first sentence with "word" was never understandable to me. Maybe that's the reason why I am agnostic. :)
 
I am deeply in love with Roman history and culture, thus I think it is not complete (and embarrassing) if I don't know any Latin. For me there is no other ancient civilization as great as Rome, not even China. I even have a theory that if Rome never collapse, we might have computers and internet at least 500 years earlier than present time (or perhaps much earlier). Rome and Lingua Latina have so much impact to the world. Today, more than half of human population use their characters, many language of great nations (English, Spanish, French) are derived from Latin as well.
 

Interficio

Civis Illustris
Wow this is a very interesting quetsion to which I'll probably write a lengthy response.

Well last year in 7th grade, I took Introduction to foreign languages which taught me a little latin,french,german, and spanish. I thought latin seemed simple enough and the IFL teacher taught latin I as well. I figured, IFL was easy so latin'll be a snap. I was wrong...

I had an A (98%) in the class firts quarter but I really had no idea about the other grammar rules. Then second quarter was worse and I barely got an A (94%). Then, 3rd quarter came and I started understanding everything once we learned imeprfect/future tenses, genitive/dative cases, and ablative case rules. Then I felt comfortable with latin and earned an A (98%). Then fourth quarter everything we learned was a snap and i earned an A(100%). In fact I started wanting to learn more from latin, so I did some research and ive now mastered the future perfect/pluperfect tenses, 4th and 5th declensions, passive voice, deponents, ablative absolute and am working on participles,gerunds,gerundives,supines., all in the 8th grade.

Then came our final exam. half of it was a county assessment which i havent gotten back, and then the other half was a teacher exam in which I must have found over 15 mistakes. Some multiple choice quetsion had more than one correct answer. The only thing I had a problem on was a sentence concerning appositives which we never learned.
Anyways I have basically become a latin I expert in the 8th grade with a final grade of A (no one else has earned an A in that class the entire year) and i hope to learn more latin 2 grammar during the summer so I can prepare for latin II next year. Im also attempting to translate parts of the aeneid (with no luck!) hehe.

Overall I have found latin a very advanced language ahead of its time and i think it is a shame that it isnt spoken anymore. But oh well I hope to take Latin II-Latin AP vergil in high school and more latin in college, maybe even becoming a latin I teacher.

Wish me luck on my latin career!
 

xanderh

New Member
good luck

I started learnig atin in my 2nd year of high school when I was 13, I picked it because I wanted to pick 2 languages between fench, latin and german, I picked french and latin, I just finished the national exam and gt the results in august.
The exam consists of a latin to english translation, inerpitation (answering questions about latin poems/stories) and a personnal invesigation which has to be submitted before the exam, we don't do any english to latin tanslations.
right now we are learning greek in the latin class cause wehave finishd the coursework
 

zoomzan

New Member
When I was a kid, I grew up reading two genre of literature - Canadiana (such as Anne of Green Gable) and Victorian romances (such as Dickens and Austen).

You notice, very quickly, that every educated character in these novels knew Latin.

I took Latin and Ancient Greek in high-school. Unfortunately, I returned everything I learnt to my teacher.

A while ago, I became sick. One day, my mom asked me why I didn't read Latin anymore. At first, I was depressed that my sickness impeded my studies. But then, I understood that I had to stop feeling sorry for myself.

I had a copy of Wheelock in the house. I quickly read through the whole thing and did all the exercises within a week. Since then, I spend a little time each week working on my Latin. I'm happy to say I can read original Latin now (well, in general).

This is my story - even if it appears foolish to wiser folks.
 

Interficio

Civis Illustris
It isnt foolish. Some people have memories like pachyderms, others don't. No biggie.

Good luck on your "relearning" Latin. :D

If you need any help, I'm always willing, even if I can only help you with some basics.
(No literature/poetic meter stuff, lol)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Ex boyfrinds tatoo

my ex got a tattoo that said Amo omnis quod peto justicia, and I wanted to see if it said what he thought it did.[/list]
 

Eruresto

New Member
I got started on Latin by studying C.S. Lewis for my high school freshmen final essay. When I had to pick my foreign language class I was limited. Spanish and French were boring (Spanish in Texas sounds terrible sorry) German was ok. Since West Texas schools don’t offer Japanese I figure I would learn a language that Lewis knew.
 
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