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  1. Iáson Cívis Illústris

    • Civis Illustris
    pendēre animī. Apparently animī may be a fossilised locative.
  2. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    There's a lot of those expressions with animi, like incertus animi, etc. Terence has Antipho me excruciat animi.
    Iáson likes this.
  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    De scripto dicere = to say from the writing = to read out loud from written text.

    A se ortus = born from oneself = self-made as in "a self-made man". Caveat: seems to be used especially in opposition to people with noble ancestry.

    In scaena esse = to be on stage = to be visible/apparent/known to the public or so.

    I came across all the above in Cicero's Pro Cn. Plancio.
  4. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    rem acu tangere = lit. "to touch the matter with a needle" = "to hit the nail on the head" (Plautus , Rudens, II.V)
    Last edited by Adrian, Apr 21, 2019
  5. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    punica fides = "carthaginian trustworthiness" = treachery or betrayal (Sallust, Bellum Iugurthinum)
    Last edited by Adrian, Apr 21, 2019
  6. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    nuces relinquere = "to abandon nuts" = "to give up one's childish ways" (Persius, Satires)
  7. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Last edited by Adrian, Apr 21, 2019
  8. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    in nuce = lit. "in a nut(shell) = "briefly stated" (Pliny, Naturalis Historia, VII.85)

    brutum fulmen = lit. "meaningless thunderbolt" = "an empty threat" (Pliny, Naturalis Historia "bruta fulmina"; II.43)
    Hadassah Branch likes this.
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That's not the way Pliny uses it. Pliny is simply explaining that, according to Cicero, the Iliad had once been enclosed in a nutshell.

    in nuce inclusam Iliadem Homeri carmen
    in membrana scriptum tradit Cicero.
  10. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    the way you formatted that quote I thought it was a line of poetry
    Bitmap likes this.
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It's just PHI's usual weird formatting...
  12. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I know
  13. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Same.
  14. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
  15. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    Yeah, I started scanning it as an hexametre. :D
  16. Iáson Cívis Illústris

    • Civis Illustris
    'tilting at windmills'
  17. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    I'm very late to this discussion, but I wouldn't say "to burn the candle at both ends" means to do two things at once -- it's more like what Pacifica said, but specifically it refers to staying up late and getting up early to work, or more generally exhausting oneself for the sake of getting lots done.

    A better one for "to do two things at once" is "walk and chew gum at the same time".
  18. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Apparently that's the sanitised version. What Johnson really said about Ford was that he couldn't fart and chew gum at the same time.
  19. Mellivora Capensis New Member

    Horace - Odes Book 1, Verse 25
    sub Iove frigido ≈ 'in the open air'
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Sub iove is an idiom meaning "in the open air". Frigido is a circumstantial addition.

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