Aeneid XIII - Maffeo Vegio

Katarina

Member
But what goes then altior with? Is it 'quite a big Aeneas'?

Does this passage says that Aeneas was physically tall? Does Virgil ever mention something like that?
 

Katarina

Member
Nunc te, quam primum aurora rubebit
crastina, sublimem Rutulorum ad moenia mittam.

Could be sublimem be translated as celebrated? Or is it meant that they raised hima and carried him to the walls? The context is Aeneas talking to Iulus, saying that finally that day came when the distress is over. and this is a last sentence of the speech.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
But what goes then altior with? Is it 'quite a big Aeneas'?

Does this passage says that Aeneas was physically tall? Does Virgil ever mention something like that?
altus does not refer to the physical size of a human being. It means 'high' or 'in a high position'.

I would take it to be some kind of pleonasm that goes together with superemineo.
"the same Aeneas, higher (than everyone else), overtops everyone else"
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Nunc te, quam primum aurora rubebit
crastina, sublimem Rutulorum ad moenia mittam.

Could be sublimem be translated as celebrated? Or is it meant that they raised hima and carried him to the walls? The context is Aeneas talking to Iulus, saying that finally that day came when the distress is over. and this is a last sentence of the speech.
I think it's the latter interpretation.
 

Katarina

Member
altus does not refer to the physical size of a human being. It means 'high' or 'in a high position'.

I would take it to be some kind of pleonasm that goes together with superemineo.
"the same Aeneas, higher (than everyone else), overtops everyone else"
Hm, I always thought that in english the word high means the same as tall.
In a high position as standing on a rock and so higher or because he is a leader and has somehow higher rank ...
:think:
 

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Civis Illustris
Yes, but there's a difference between high and tall.
 

Katarina

Member
Yes, but there's a difference between high and tall.
Would you be so kind and explain it a bit more, especially in which of many possible meanings of 'high' do you understand 'altus' in this case? Maybe with description or any synonim?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
altior (like 'higher') means that he is in a higher position or rank than others, but it cannot mean that he has more body size (like 'taller').

Maybe you can also take it in the sense of 'greater' or 'nobler'...
 
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Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
altior (like 'higher') means that he is in a higher position or rank than others, but it cannot mean that he has more body size (like 'taller').

Maybe you can also take it in the sense of 'greater' or 'nobler'...
It can't mean "taller"? Do you mean in this context or in general?
Because L&S has an instance of altior meaning "taller":
altior illis Ipsa dea est colloque tenus supereminet omnes, taller Ov. M. 3, 181
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
It can't mean "taller"? Do you mean in this context or in general?
Because L&S has an instance of altior meaning "taller":
altior illis Ipsa dea est colloque tenus supereminet omnes, taller Ov. M. 3, 181
I would have said that altus should generally be used like 'high' (or 'deep') in English ... the passage you quoted seems to be more of an exception to me, but even there ... when I read it, I also took altior to mean 'in a higher position' ... at least seemingly so (i.e. when you look at the scene from the outside) because her head stuck out of the group of nymphs that surrounded her.
 

AoM

nulli numeri
Of Anchises in the Aeneid:

sed cunctis altior ibat / Anchises (8.162-3)

Brill 8 note: "There is something not far from a godlike quality to the heroes of a seemingly bygone (or at least fast fading) age, men outstanding in stature and eminence over their fellows. Yet again the focus is on appearance and the visual."
 

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Civis Illustris
tum mihi prima genas vestibat flore iuventas,
mirabarque duces Teucros, mirabar et ipsum
Laomedontiaden; sed cunctis altior ibat
Anchises.


There's no allusion to body size in this sentence, and there isn't any in the lines before or after. I don't see how altior doesn't just mean 'nobler' or 'greater' here.
 
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