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Ancient Roman Objects

 

Tironis

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Anglia
Look who's popped up again!

1652462468692.png

A woman bought a marble bust for $35 in a thrift shop in Texas. It turned out to be an invaluable antique that has been traced back — and will be returned — to Germany.
 
 

Terry S.

Aedilis

  • Aedilis

  • Patronus

Location:
Hibernia
I hope she gets her money back from the vendor.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Location:
Belgium
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
in orbe lacteo
The combination of the bizarre grammar, excellent condition of preservation, and near-total lack of information about it on the Internet (the Wikipedia article derives entirely from the museum that holds it, with no corroborating sources) made it hard for me to believe that it was a genuine artifact. I still find it hard to believe, but I have found a few academic sources that talk about it. Seemingly the weird grammar is owed to the fact that these sorts of towers had to have 6 words of 6 letters each, but there are other examples of such hexagrams with a similar sense that are perfectly grammatical (e.g. Parthi occisi / Britto victus / Ludite Romani or Virtus imperi / Hostes vincti / Ludant Romani), so it's still odd to me that this one would be so bad.
 
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