Aorist stem?

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Don't Greek dictionaries give it in the same manner as Latin ones give all forms you should know amo, amavi...? Mine doesn't it seems like. Does someone know one that does somewhere on the net? I'm being stupidely stuck in my homework right now because I need an aorist I don't know.
 

LVXORD

Civis Illustris
I have to admit that I've never actually seen a dictionary list the Greek principal parts in full... :(
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
But why on earth?! How are you supposed to do in the beginning when you know next to nothing yet?

Well, for present needs, do you by any chance know the aorist of σῴζω? Lol. That's the one I presently need to finish my sentence.
 

Lyceum

Member
Greek dictionaries ought to give the principal parts, which are present, future, aorist, perfect active, perf middle, aorist passive.

Regarding the aorist, obviously there's the problem of 1st vs 2nd aorist and the occasional irregular verb or syncretised verb. For beginners I suggest the book "i tutti verbi Greci" by....Marione? It lists several verbs fully and is a good thing to have just to flick through a few verbs each day.
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
Don't Greek dictionaries give it in the same manner as Latin ones give all forms you should know amo, amavi...? Mine doesn't it seems like. Does someone know one that does somewhere on the net? I'm being stupidely stuck in my homework right now because I need an aorist I don't know.
What is the dictionary you are using that doesn't have the forms you need?
 

Oups

Active Member
Little dictionaries don't indicate regular forms, as σῴζω aorist if you know that ζ + σ = σ
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

LVXORD

Civis Illustris
Yes, indeed it is important to memorise the various rules of contractions.
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
Thank you all.
Middle Liddell.
Does the page you're looking at look like this?
i.e:
σώζω σῶς
to save, keep:
1.of persons, to save from death, keep alive, preserve, Hom., attic
2.of things, to keep safe, preserve, Hom.:—Mid. to keep or preserve for oneself, Soph., etc.
3.to keep, observe, maintain laws, etc., Trag.:—Pass., Thuc.
4.to keep in mind, remember, Eur., Plat.:—so in Mid., Soph., Plat.
II.with a sense of motion to a place, to bring one safe to, τὸν δ᾽ ἐσάωσεν ἐς ποταμοῦ προχοάς Od.; σω. τινὰ πρὸς ἤπειρον Aesch.:—in Pass. to come safe, escape to a place, ἐς οἶκον Hdt.; ἐπὶ θάλατταν Xen.
2.to carry off safe, rescue from danger, ἐκ πολέμου Il.; ἐκ θανάτοιο Od.; ἀπὸ στρατείας Aesch.:—c. gen., ἐχθρῶν σῶσαι χθόνα to rescue the land from enemies, Soph.; Pass., σωθῆναι κακῶν Eur.
3.c. inf., αἵ σε σώζουσιν θανεῖν who save thee from dying, id=Eur.
4.absol., τὰ σώσοντα what is likely to save, Dem.


OR THIS?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It looks like the first one. I assumed the perseus and paper version were the same... Thanks anyway.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I am learning it. "Insufferable"??
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
If I would be insufferable with Greek beside Latin because I would know too many things to your taste, what kind word would you find to describe people like IR or Aurifex and a few others here? It is beyond words I guess. Lol.
 

Arca Defectionis

Civis Illustris
σῴζω only has iota subscript in the first part. The aorist is ἔσωσα. It appears to me that the root is really σω-, more or less, and then it takes the ending -ιζω (like βαπτίζω or νομίζω), it's just that the iota contracts with the omega. Perhaps because there's already a vowel there, though, it loses the iota in all the other parts, unlike other verbs using that ending.
 
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