ave ave aves esse aves?

kylefoley202

New Member
Pretty cool play on words, apparently it means, Good day, dad, do you want to eat some birds. If anyone knows of any others, I'd love to hear it.
 

kylefoley202

New Member
Thanks for pointing that out. i got it from a french dictionary and they translated it as papa. But I just looked up 'ave' and it's translated always as grandfather never as father, so I learned something new.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
Tolle -me -mi -mu -mis si declinare domum vis (Hexameter)

domum and vis shoud sound almost like a single word "domumvis".
 
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EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
It must be said that the expression I've written is essentialy "wrong" (not wrong wrong, only partially wrong) if you consider the locative (e.g. "domi militiaeque", which is a "state of mind", not only the designation of a place where you happen to be). But this is a useless point. Don't let it bother you.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
which is a "state of mind", not only the designation of a place where you happen to be
Domi can perfectly be (and very often is) the designation of a place where you happen to be.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ah, I thought you were implying that domi was only ever used that way.

I'm not sure I would call it a "state of mind" there, actually, but I guess it is a bit more figurative than just a statement about being in one's house.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
What I wanted to say is: the phrase is normally translated "In peace and in war". The phrase "domi militiaeque" can be found in all grammar books and, should kylefoley202 google it, he'll discover it's all over the place. ;)
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
I fail to understand the relevance of a phrase that nobody was talking about until it was dragged in.
A brief summary of this thread (I fail to understand why I'm doing this)
Pretty cool play on words, apparently it means, Good day, dad, do you want to eat some birds. If anyone knows of any others, I'd love to hear it.
granddad, actually
yeah, there was something also with malo
Latin mnemonics, Latin mnemonics, Latin mnemonics, Latin mnemonics, Latin mnemonics
:love::love::love::love::love: A hug from your favourite mouse, dear Etaoin. It wasn't me who ate your ears, I swear.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
You haven't actually quoted the most relevant posts:
Tolle -me -mi -mu -mis si declinare domum vis (Hexameter)

domum and vis shoud sound almost like a single word "domumvis".
It must be said that the expression I've written is essentialy "wrong" (not wrong wrong, only partially wrong) if you consider the locative (e.g. "domi militiaeque", which is a "state of mind", not only the designation of a place where you happen to be). But this is a useless point. Don't let it bother you.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
I was referring to EQFL's introduction of domi militiaeque, and the weird bit about the locative being a state of mind. Why the OP would wish to google this phrase is unclear. Is it a mnemonic for something?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
EQFI introduced domi militiaeque as an example of the use of domi, illustrating the fact that Tolle -me -mi -mu -mis si declinare domum vis isn't quite accurate, since the form domi does exist (as does domu, by the way, though this one is actually less common). Now, why he chose to mention the specific expression domi militiaeque, rather than just the existence of domi in general, I don't know.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
I was referring to EQFL's introduction of domi militiaeque, and the weird bit about the locative being a state of mind. Why the OP would wish to google this phrase is unclear. Is it a mnemonic for something?
Sorry I didn't understand it was that the phrase you were referring to. It just popped up in my mind because grammar books usually have it. In fact, if you use the search function of the forum you'll see it has been mentioned before several times.

S.W.A.K. ;)
 
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