Tattoo Battle Scars

LindaHatch

New Member
Hello,

I would like a few phrases translated into Latin. A friend of mine is trying to create a slogan/personal motto and I said that I would help out.

The phrases are:

"Battle Scars"
"Moments of Character"
"Tempered through Fire"
"Scarred but undefeated"
"Ultimate Perseverance"

I think this may end up becoming a tattoo. Many thanks!
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
Hi
pugnae cicatrices - battle scars
igne induratus or flammis induratus - Tempered through fire
suprema perseverantia or postrema perseverantia or novissima perseverantia or extrema perseverantia- Ultimate perseverance
cicatricibus compunctus sed invictus - Scarred but undefeated

I don't actually grasp the idea of "Moments of Character", could you explain a little more?
 

LindaHatch

New Member
Sure!

Moments of Character...frankly I'm stumped by that one too. My friend is a photographer so he likes to say that when he takes someone's portrait he's looking for a moment that demonstrates their character. Whatever that means.

Your guess is as good as mine.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
Frankly, I don't know how to translate "Moments of Character". I mean, a literal translation here wouldn't do. I hope more capable members such as @Pacifica or @Matthaeus or other I forgot to mention can help us here.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
pugnae cicatrices - battle scars
Note that that refers to scars from one battle. If the scars are from several battles, pugnae should be changed to pugnarum.
suprema perseverantia or postrema perseverantia or novissima perseverantia or extrema perseverantia- Ultimate perseverance
I don't think any of those quite work. They all sound more like "the last perseverance". Maybe summa perseverantia would come closer, though I wouldn't say it's an exact equivalent either.
Frankly, I don't know how to translate "Moments of Character". I mean, a literal translation here wouldn't do. I hope more capable members such as @Pacifica or @Matthaeus or other I forgot to mention can help us here.
Well, I'm not sure, but based on the explanation in post #3 I might perhaps hazard a kind of literal momenta indolis...? That may be a little weird and vague, but on the other hand if we start explicitating it as "moment in which a person's character appears" or so, we'll end up with something quite long.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
I don't think any of those quite work. They all sound more like "the last perseverance". Maybe summa perseverantia would come closer, though I wouldn't say it's an exact equivalent either.
Ok, thank you. I take note. "Summus" is better indeed, but very similar in meaning to "supremus". I looked up the word "ultimate" in the C.E.D.: and it has a wide range of meanings I just picked one (last in a series, most important, highest, last or final, ...).
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Glabrigausapes

Lammergeyer
@Glabrigausapes adiuvabisne nos sodalis?
:no-clue:

I was thinking the Latin equivalent of 'telling', like 'a telling name' (I nome parlante), one that indicates its 'nature/character' by its sound/appearance. But I don't know if such an equivalence exists.
 

Glabrigausapes

Lammergeyer
Momenta Loquentia? Momenta Quae Loquuntur? Momenta Quae Patefaciunt?
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
If I had to try on Glabrigausapes's line of thought, I would say

momentum manifestans

Although, my favourite is "momenta quae patefaciunt"
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
That all sounds a bit odd. Not that my own suggestion doesn't, I guess.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
"Moments of Character"
Very difficult! "Moments when the true person can be seen"?
a moment that demonstrates their character.
I am thinking, then, that "glimpses of character", or "glimpses of the true person" is more like it? I know what is meant, but it is even hard to convey in English! Still very hard to translate...
Note that that refers to scars from one battle. If the scars are from several battles, pugnae should be changed to pugnarum.

I don't think any of those quite work...if we start explicitating it as "moment in which a person's character appears" or so, we'll end up with something quite long.
Indeed, it appears to be one of those, those for which Latin concepts are not sufficient. In such cases, my inclination is to go full-out Shakespearean, and start creating words. Something like moris visiculi or dispositionis moralis visiculae, wherein visum "a seeing" + -culus/-cula, and so "a little seeing, a glimpse". This is just "Mikey being Mikey", though.
 
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