Casu audivi

Brained Out

New Member
From an exercise on p. 364 of "Latin for Americans", First Book, B. L. Ullman and Norman E Henry, Macmillan, 1947, please help me translate this into Latin:

By chance I heard our leader say that there was no chance of peace.

Casu audivi principem nostrum dicere causum pacis non esse.

But translating back to English:

By chance I heard that our leader said that there was no chance of peace.

I need to convey the fact that I heard our leader say this, not that I had heard that he had said this.

Should I use a participle?

Casu principem nostrum dicentem audivi casum pacis non esse.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Should I use a participle?

Casu principem nostrum dicentem audivi casum pacis non esse.
Yes, the participle is more common in this context.
 

Anbrutal Russicus

Active Member
Casu audivi principem nostrum dicere causum pacis non esse.
I need to convey the fact that I heard our leader say this, not that I had heard that he had said this.
I think only the first interpretation is generally possible in absence of further indications; for the latter you'd at the very least want a past tense dīxisse, unless you've been hearing him say that constantly, in which case you'd at least expect a frequentative verb dictitāre (and no cāsū). To relate a rumour you'd pick a less ambiguous expression with sermōnēs, fāma, rūmor, or a whole different verb like accēpī - which would still call for dīxisse.
 
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