Coeli te cito

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
a warning in medevil german kurrent script, do not read aloud without a circle around you
Yes, very dangerous! I uttered aloud a few dangerous Latin phrases written in medieval letters in my life WITHOUT actually drawing the circle first and I'm lucky I got out of the hands of the daemons unscathed! Latin is a dangerous subject, very dangerous.
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
I got out of the hands of the daemons unscathed!
The truth is though, that I actually was lucky in having one of those medieval scripts not being the original, but a forgery... the forgery doesn't have that much power as the original does (so the Satan himself didn't come, luckily)

@LCF
 
I'm not an expert there. I wouldn't give any credit to that book, and consider it nothing more than a funny story. Then you are, of course, free to do as you wish.
sorry again may i ask 1 more question do you think google translate for pronounciation is good cause the pronounciation you gave me was the exact same as google translate so that gives me some confidence in google maby being correct also? thanks again
 
Yes, very dangerous! I uttered aloud a few dangerous Latin phrases written in medieval letters in my life WITHOUT actually drawing the circle first and I'm lucky I got out of the hands of the daemons unscathed! Latin is a dangerous subject, very dangerous.
wow were you aware what you were speaking was it a citation / conjuration of a spirit. true ive seen alot of magic books this particular one ive come across as ive been talking a bit about seems much much different from anything else i have seen regarding faustian magick, i regard it lucky that its not in the public domain so to speak if one digs deep enough one can find it online but with much much effort and even then its hard to translate the actual citations of the spirits
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes, very dangerous! I uttered aloud a few dangerous Latin phrases written in medieval letters in my life WITHOUT actually drawing the circle first and I'm lucky I got out of the hands of the daemons unscathed! Latin is a dangerous subject, very dangerous.
[/QUOTthank you also for your translation earlier i apprecite the help greatly here! :)
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
Every diocesan library has always had a section for what today we call "exoterism" where the "custodes librorum" would keep the millenaristic stuff and "infernalia" (even theological treateses like the quattrorum sententiarum that had sometimes desecrating images, a Tractatus Geomantiae, ...). In the XV century (and before too) these books for invocations to the deuce were entitled "tabula Fungonis" or "Tabula Salomonis" and ascribed to King Solomon. They normally have desecrating contents, with very deceptive statements:
"Invocantes namque demones, quantum ad modum, tripharie variantur, prout in libris nigromanticis apparet, et principaliter in libro qui Salomonis adscribitur, qui Tabule Salomonis intitulatur: super quo iurant demones advocati de dicenda veritate, sicut nos Christiani super quatuor Dei Evangelia et Hebrei super Legem Dei quam dedit Moysi"

Dominicans and Franciscans used this books to inspire their "Exempla".
These closets were defined "inferni" and documents were mostly hidden.

Sometimes you find some interesting things in this books, however:
Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere curas
Felix qui potuit sclopeti cognoscere astas
Felix qui potuit naso cercar coreas
Felix qui potuit digitis abstergere culum
Then there's a hole on the page, around which the author wrote:
Tu qui legis
pone hic culum

Here everyone's joking, but I woudn't joke too much with this stuff.

sorry again may i ask 1 more question do you think google translate for pronounciation is good cause the pronounciation you gave me was the exact same as google translate so that gives me some confidence in google maby being correct also? thanks again
I don't think google Translate is an authority. Neither am I, but I really wouldn't take G.T. too seriously.
 
Every diocesan library has always had a section for what today we call "exoterism" where the "custodes librorum" would keep the millenaristic stuff and "infernalia" (even theological treateses like the quattrorum sententiarum that had sometimes desecrating images, a Tractatus Geomantiae, ...). In the XV century (and before too) these books for invocations to the deuce were entitled "tabula Fungonis" or "Tabula Salomonis" and ascribed to King Solomon. They normally have desecrating contents, with very deceptive statements:
"Invocantes namque demones, quantum ad modum, tripharie variantur, prout in libris nigromanticis apparet, et principaliter in libro qui Salomonis adscribitur, qui Tabule Salomonis intitulatur: super quo iurant demones advocati de dicenda veritate, sicut nos Christiani super quatuor Dei Evangelia et Hebrei super Legem Dei quam dedit Moysi"

Dominicans and Franciscans used this books to inspire their "Exempla".
These closets were defined "inferni" and documents were mostly hidden.

Sometimes you find some interesting things in this books, however:
Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere curas
Felix qui potuit sclopeti cognoscere astas
Felix qui potuit naso cercar coreas
Felix qui potuit digitis abstergere culum
Then there's a hole on the page, around which the author wrote:
Tu qui legis
pone hic culum

Here everyone's joking, but I woudn't joke too much with this stuff.



I don't think google Translate is an authority. Neither am I, but I really wouldn't take G.T. too seriously.
wow very interesting input thank you for sharing that! yeah not quite something to take lightly you never know what might be roused to come and appear with some words unknown to us.
 

LCF

One of "those" people
The truth is though, that I actually was lucky in having one of those medieval scripts not being the original, but a forgery... the forgery doesn't have that much power as the original does (so the Satan himself didn't come, luckily)

@LCF
6540068-devil.gif
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
I don't think in 1605 they were so interested in pronunciation. I think everyone pronounced with an inflection and most certainly used the Scholastica as a general rule.
It depended a lot on the region. At that time most parts of Europe still retained a local tradition of pronouncing Latin according to the pattern of their native language, although there is some evidence that Italian pronunciation was seen as more authoritative:

It's at the end of the 19th century and over the course of the 20th that the Italian/Ecclesiastica pronunciation was prescribed by the Catholic Church and progressively supplanted the local versions of other regions.

I suppose Faust would have used some sort of traditional medieval German pronunciation of Latin, given that he was born and educated in Germany. However, I doubt very much that the demons will object to the Italian ecclesiastical pronunciation; they might consider it more authentic.
 
It depended a lot on the region. At that time most parts of Europe still retained a local tradition of pronouncing Latin according to the pattern of their native language, although there is some evidence that Italian pronunciation was seen as more authoritative:

It's at the end of the 19th century and over the course of the 20th that the Italian/Ecclesiastica pronunciation was prescribed by the Catholic Church and progressively supplanted the local versions of other regions.

I suppose Faust would have used some sort of traditional medieval German pronunciation of Latin, given that he was born and educated in Germany. However, I doubt very much that the demons will object to the Italian ecclesiastical pronunciation; they might consider it more authentic.
thank you very much for this insight makes me wonder
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
I can't help recalling a particularly famous exemplum, which raised into popularity in the middle ages. It is about a young seminarist who lived in a crowded house and happened to come across a Tabula Salomonis and invoke the deuce. The boy asked for a house only for him where he could study without being bothered by his relatives. Long story short he came back home and found out the spirit had fulfilled his wish by murdering all his family members. Fare you well ;)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"of God as well as of other creatures", lol.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
What made me laugh is that "of God as well as of other creatures" implies that God himself is a creature, which he isn't supposed to be (a creature is a created thing).
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Civis Illustris
@needhelpwith latin
You have kinda upset me with this thread. The very thought of this thread is haunting me. The fact that yesterday a 16-years-old boy stabbed to death a 15-years-old girl near Bologna, Italy, claiming that the deuce told him to murder her doesn't help. True story.
 
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