Mediaeval consolationem et placiditatem quamdam animabus ingerunt

Big Ups

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Thanks for the help. I have my attempt at a literal translation below and then a less literal translation below that. I am trying to figure out what acceptable less-literal translations looks like. So, first of all is my literal trans correct, and secondly, would my less-literal trans be acceptable?


consolationem et placiditatem quamdam animabus ingerunt, sed

tandem eas relinquunt desolatas et prae contrarietate ac inimicitia

sua patefactas ita ut horror quidam et deforis turbatio in facie et

oculis perpetuo remaneat.



They (i.e., false angels) bring a certain consolation and serenity to souls, but

eventually, they abandon these empty [gestures], and thus revealed

because of their evil and hostility, with the result that a certain dread and disturbance remain externally in the face and eyes [of their victimes] perpetually



False angels bring a certain consolation and serenity to souls but

eventually, they abandon these empty [gestures]. Once they are thus revealed

on account of their evil and hostility, a certain dread and disturbance remain externally in the face and eyes [of their victimes] perpetually.
 

Pacifica

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Let's take care of the literal translation first, because you've got a couple of things wrong.
they abandon these empty [gestures]
Desolatas refers to animabus. Relinquunt would translate better as "leave" here.
thus revealed

because of their evil and hostility, with the result that
The ita, rather than referring back to what precedes, anticipates the ut clause. Ita ut = "so that", "in such a way that".
 

Big Ups

Member

Alright, the material after the "et" is still giving me trouble. What about the following?

They (i.e., false angels) bring a certain consolation and serentity to souls, but eventually they leave them empty, and revealed in such a way that a certain dread and disturbance remain externally in the face and eyes [of their
victims] perpetually because of their evil and hostility.

OR
...revealed because of their evil and hostility, in such a way that a certain dread and disturbance remain externally in the face and eyes [of their
victims] perpetually.
 

Pacifica

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I'm not sure about translating contrarietate as "evil". Maybe something like "waywardness" would come closer? I'm not really sure what it means exactly, but "evil" seems like a stretch at first sight. For the rest, your second version is the good one. Prae contrarietate ac inimicitia sua goes with patefactas; it doesn't belong to the next clause.
 

Pacifica

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Eas, desolatas and patefactas all refer to the souls.
 

Big Ups

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But isn't it the emptiness of the soul that is being revealed?

...and (that emptiness) having been revealed--because of their waywardness and hostility--in such a way that a dread remains...

OR
... and (those souls) having been revealed--because of waywardness and hostility-- in such a way that a dread remains...
 

Pacifica

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But isn't it the emptiness of the soul that is being revealed?
No, the souls are being revealed. You can see that patefactas agrees in gender and number with the souls, while it wouldn't agree with a noun meaning "emptiness", were such a noun present (which it isn't).
 

Big Ups

Member

Thank you. Perhaps "exposed" works better for patefactas, as in made vulnerable. To me, "revealed" suggests that some quality of the soul or the soul itself is made known, which doesn't seem to fit the meaning that follows. If that is the case, doesn't the sentence still need an additional verb, something like "are exposed" to complete the sentence?

They (i.e., false angels) bring a certain consolation and serenity to souls, but eventually, they leave them empty, and (those souls) having been exposed--because of waywardness and hostility--are exposed in such a way that a certain dread and disturbance remain externally in the face and eyes [of their victims] perpetually.
 

Pacifica

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Thank you. Perhaps "exposed" works better for patefactas, as in made vulnerable. To me, "revealed" suggests that some quality of the soul or the soul itself is made known, which doesn't seem to fit the meaning that follows.
One could argue that "revealed" makes sense because the dread and disturbance seen in the eyes and face are the souls revealed, but I think "exposed" is a good idea.
If that is the case, doesn't the sentence still need an additional verb, something like "are exposed" to complete the sentence?
No, it doesn't. "They leave them empty and exposed" is complete.
 

Big Ups

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forgive this basic question, but are desolatas and patefactas in this sentence adjectives or perf pass PPls?
 

Pacifica

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Perfect passive participles.
 
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