Dictionary Recommendation

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Well, though Callaina is maybe being a little weird on this point, let's just let her do as she prefers. I don't think an endless discussion will turn out being very pleasant or productive for either of you. ;)
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
Yes, it probably won't be productive :) I just wanted to make sure that it is understood that all the resources I offered give you pages written in proper Greek and you also type the word there with the idea that you've read FIRST in a proper Greek

(you have a proper Greek mental input, you transliterate just for one mid-step, and proper Greek output)

And most of beta-code just depends on how well you've learned to read the Greek alphabet: no complexity, no artificial difficulty.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
You know, Callaina, you can set up your keyboard for Polytonic Greek Unicode if you want to actually type in Greek. Perseus's lookup tool will recognize Greek text as well, and you don't have to get the diacritics right (it ignores them for the input).
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
You know, Callaina, you can set up your keyboard for Polytonic Greek Unicode if you want to actually type in Greek. Perseus's lookup tool will recognize Greek text as well, and you don't have to get the diacritics right (it ignores them for the input).
This would definitely work better for me, since the characters will show up as Greek on my screen. I'll look into how to do this on my system, thanks :)
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Yes, it probably won't be productive :) I just wanted to make sure that it is understood that all the resources I offered give you pages written in proper Greek and you also type the word there with the idea that you've read FIRST in a proper Greek
Understood. Thanks for clarifying, though.

(you have a proper Greek mental input, you transliterate just for one mid-step
Ah, but there lies the rub. ;)
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
Ah, but there lies the rub. ;)
I sincerely think that's a false belief since by typing on the polytonic Greek keyb. is just pushing the same keys as if beta-code... I don't believe it could harm you in any way as you're just typing out the word which is in your mind (and then reading it in the dictionary), but whatever.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I sincerely think that's a false belief since by typing on the polytonic Greek keyb. is just pushing the same keys as if beta-code...
Well, it's true I'd still rather have a Greek keyboard, but at least I will see the word written out in proper Greek letters on my screen (and this makes a massive difference to the way I remember it.)
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
LOL, like I said: for anyone else it would work, but for me it doesn't, because I learn visually, and I'm more familiar with Latin letters (obviously); so if I type it in Latin letters, I'll remember that and not the way the word looks in Greek. :p
I sympathize unhesitatingly, and I've an anecdote partly explaining why.

Some time ago I was re-binding some books for a library. One of the books was a very rare 16th century Greek liturgical book. The title on the title page was Ωρολόγιον. There was no title on the actual binding, but I was asked to supply one. The trouble is that everywhere in the bibliographical notes that accompanied the book whilst it was in my hands there were transcriptions of the title written as either Horologion or Orologion. When I came to title the binding in gold leaf using a Greek font of letters I ended up putting Oρολόγιον (actually all in capitals). The mistake is there for everyone to see for centuries to come. All because I'd been distracted by that abomination that is transliterated Greek.
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
A funny story, Aurifex!

(As I said already, slightly off-topic to your story, I think that having to read ancient Greek via beta-code [ w(rolo/gion ] is an abomination! I use it only as a transitional state... I think it is really unfortunate anytime the beta-code stays in its raw form (uncoverted to polytonic Greek) for good and must be read like that! I don't really think that Greek should ever be read from a beta-code. I must just serve its transitional purpose.)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Aurifex's mistake couldn't have happened with the beta-code, since omicron = o and omega = w.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
They should have warned Aurifex though, that beta-code should be used...
Aurifex's job had nothing to do with beta-code... He just had to write the title in true Greek letters and went wrong because his brain had been influenced by a Latin-letter transcription in bibliographical notes.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I'm not sure he had to type anything at all, I was imagining this whole gold-leaf title thing was done by hand...
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
Huh, it turns out that, if for every Greek vowel we type out all the combinations it can have, given the diacritical signs + some extra signs (accents, aspiration, iota subscriptum, breves, macrons, diaresis...), then we get altogether more than 200+ vowel combinations: and one must include this if they want to make a converter xD
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
Alright, you must be the first person, Callaina, who forced me to do some change on the website without postponing it ad infinitum...

So, it wasn't easy, but I've included the change http://latindiscussion.com/forum/latin/latin-greek-greek-latin-dictionaries-ancient-greek.24616/

You can now type Greek letters there (even polytonic Greek: with all the accents and diacritics) and you don't need anymore to use the beta-code.

Could you test it, perhaps? Also Imber Ranae could test it (I suppose he has the polytonic Greek keyboard installed).

Now the input should work just like on Perseus.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Wow, that was fast! Very impressive. I'll check it out :)
 
Top