News (Ancient) Did archaeologists find the Trojan Horse?

Bestiola

Sciura Tigrina Croatica

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Turkish archaeologists excavating the site of the city of Troy on the hills of Hisarlik have discovered a large wooden structure that they believe are the remains of the famous Trojan Horse.

Archaeologists who claimed they had unearthed remnants of the legendary Trojan Horse in Turkey have now found significant evidence that further supports their claim, according to an article by the Greek Reporter.

Turkish archaeologists excavating the site of the city of Troy on the hills of Hisarlik have discovered a large wooden structure that they believe are the remains of the Trojan Horse. These excavations include dozens of fir planks and beams up to 15 meters (49 feet) long, assembled in a strange form.

The wooden structure was found inside the walls of the ancient city of Troy.

Now, Boston University professors Christine Morris and Chris Wilson believe that "the carbon dating tests and other analyses have all suggested that the wooden pieces and other artifacts date from the 12th or 11th centuries BC."

Morris and Wilson believe with a "high level of confidence" that the structure is linked to the iconic horse. They say that tests have only confirmed their theory.

“This matches the dates cited for the Trojan War, by many ancient historians like Eratosthenes or Proclus. The assembly of the work also matches the description made by many sources. I don’t want to sound overconfident, but I’m pretty certain that we found the real thing!”

 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima

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That sounds very exciting, but alas I can't help being skeptical. A bunch of planks and beams could have been a lot of things. What tests exactly lead the archeologists to believe it was likely a wooden horse?
 
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LCF

One of "those" people

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That sounds very exciting, but alas I can't help being skeptical. A bunch of planks and beams could have been a lot of things. What tests exactly lead the archeologists to believe it was likely a wooden horse?
That's how archeology works. They make shit up.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

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They wouldn't have got into the news by announcing they'd found some wooden bits that were probably part of a building since demolished or fallen into disrepair.

There may well have been some conflict between Greeks and Trojans, and maybe, just maybe, it kicked off after someone ran off with someone else's wife (though I remain sceptical), but surely the story of the Trojan Horse is one of the least likely to have any historical basis? After 10 years of failing to get into a city, they just allegedly piss off, leaving behind a bizarre structure that the inhabitants think would be a great idea to take inside? Really?
 
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Iáson

Cívis Illústris

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Etaoin Shrdlu

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Believe it or not, this is still only the beginning of the Greek Reporter article’s credibility problems. Flint Dibble, a specialist in Greek archaeology who is currently a fellow at Cardiff University’s School of History, Archaeology and Religion, points out in a tweet that there are no researchers or professors of any kind affiliated with Boston University named “Christine Morris” or “Chris Wilson.”
What a world, where there is no Christine Morris or Chris Wilson, or at least those who bear the names do not make pronouncements about antiquity at Boston University. Yet Flint Dibble lives and breathes.
 
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