Do vs does

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Apparently, yes. We also call it "la grande guerre".
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Yes. Well not much in America, I think, but I'm pretty sure that is the British locution.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
In America, I've only seen it in history books and jokes, like if someone's making a joke about a time traveler who went to the present:
"So, what happens after the Great War?"
"You mean World War I?"
"What?"
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I heard that Clinton got a little more votes than Trump by mere numbers, actually (but Trump won because of your complicated system whereby some states count more than others or something).

oO You really don't seem to care much about politics if you don't know how the electoral college works :D It's not so much a matter of whether some states count more as a matter of the first-past-the-post system (which you also find in the UK, just not with states, but with individual mandates from different voting districts).

So in other words, it doesn't matter whether you California by 60% or by 90% as long as you lose 3 others states by 49:51.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Right...
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
In America, I've only seen it in history books and jokes, like if someone's making a joke about a time traveler who went to the present:
"So, what happens after the Great War?"
"You mean World War I?"
"What?"
Same in Canada.

"Great War" is also only used in the historical sense and to avoid creating an anachronism.
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
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