Genitive of value

Kuba26

non sum dignus
I have tried to translate "The soul of the unjust man is not worthy of a prize." I am wondering whether I have done a good job, particularly with the genitive of value. (N.B. I have not bothered with the diacritics here.)

My attempt: η του αδικου αντθρωπου ψυχη αναξια αθλου
 

Kuba26

non sum dignus
Drop the τ in αντθρωπου, or better yet, drop ανθρωπου altogether.
The τ is a typo I suspect, but why leave out ανθρωπου?
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
The τ is a typo I suspect, but why leave out ανθρωπου?
I think it could be inferred from the context - "the unjust one". (I mean, what else is going to have a soul anyway? ;) )
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Or why not even simplify it further? "The unjust soul is not worthy of a prize."
 

Kuba26

non sum dignus
I think it could be inferred from the context - "the unjust one".
Thanks for the feedback. I suspected someone was going to say that. It's a good point of course, but the phrase I wanted to translate was "The soul of the unjust man is not worthy of a prize." that's why I went for the genitive ανθρωπου. I guess my follow-up question would be: was my initial translation (η του αδικου ανθρωπου ψυχη αναξια αθλου) wrong or just in bad style, so to speak?
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I don't think it's wrong exactly, but just rather cumbersome/unidiomatic.
 

Kuba26

non sum dignus
I don't think it's wrong exactly, but just rather cumbersome/unidiomatic.
Alright, thanks for the tip:)
Would ἐπαινέω be appropriate here?
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Alright, thanks for the tip:)
Would ἐπαινέω be appropriate here?
In what sense?

(Keep in mind I'm a Greek student too, so don't take my replies as authoritative. ;) )
 

Kuba26

non sum dignus
Well, is it?:)
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
My lexicon only gives it in the sense of "thanks, but no thanks" (declining an offer politely).

My textbook (Athenaze) uses χάριν ἀποδίδωμι, but I'm not entirely sure that's idiomatic. Liddell and Scott give χάριν εἰδέναι τινί = to feel grateful, acknowledge a sense of favour, but that seems like a rather indirect way of saying "thank you."

Maybe the Ancient Greeks just didn't say "thank you" in this modern sense?
 

Kuba26

non sum dignus

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
I am guessing, probably wrongly, that the standard modern ευχαριστώ that even tourists know comes from εὐχαρίζω, which just about makes it into LSJ.
 
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