Help translating prayers...

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
So:
The Resurrection
On the third day, the first Easter Sunday morning, Jesus rises from the dead.
Faith
Resurrectio
Die tertia, prima Dominica Die Paschali mane, Iesus a mortuis resurgit.
Fides
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The Baptism in the Jordan
The voice of the Father declares Jesus the beloved son.
Baptisma in Iordane
Vox Patris Iesum filium dilectum declarat.
Openness to the Holy Spirit
Not sure how to translate "openness".
The Wedding at Cana
Christ changes water into wine, his first public miracle.
To Jesus through Mary
Nuptiae Canenses
Christus aquam vertit in vinum, quod fuit primum eius miraculum palam factum.
Ad Iesum per Mariam
The Proclamation of the Kingdom
Jesus calls to conversion and forgives the sins of all who draw near to him.
Repentance and Trust in God
Praedicatio Regni
Iesus vocat ad conversionem et dimittit peccata omnium adeuntium se.
Paenitentia et Dei Fiducia
The Transfiguration
The glory of the Godhead shines forth from the face of Christ.
Desire for holiness
Transfiguratio
Gloria Divinitatis a Christi facie effulget.
Desiderium sanctitatis
The Institution of the Eucharist
Jesus offers the first Mass at the Last Supper with his apostles, establishing the sacramental foundation for all Christian living.
Adoration
Institutio Eucharistiae
Iesus Vltima Cena cum apostolis suis primam praebet Missam, sacramentale fundamentum instituens omnis Christianae vitae.
Adoratio
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

CarloScalisi

New Member
Oh, I'm so sorry. I didn't see your subsequent response with the remaining translations. Thank you!!!

Not sure how to translate "openness".

Pacifica, what do you think about "acceptio Spiritus Sancti" for "Openness to the Holy Spirit"? Does it make sense? Is it grammatically correct?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It is grammatically correct and means literally "reception" or "acceptance of the Holy Spirit".
 

CarloScalisi

New Member
It is grammatically...
Pacifica, how about the following "fruits" of the Sorrowful Mysteries:

Sorrow for sin
Purity
Courage
Patience
Perseverance

I guessed the following, but certainly am not sure:
Paenitentia peccatorum
Puritas
Virtus
Patientia
Constantia

Also, would you happen to know where the stress is placed in the word "agonia"? I'm guessing "agonía," but I can't find any confirmation online.

Once again, thank you so much!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Paenitentia peccatorum
That is "repentance for sins". For "sorrow" you could say maeror.

The others are ok. For "courage" you could also say fortitudo. Fortitudo is more restricted in meaning, while virtus is broader. You can compare them and see for yourself which seems better to you for your purposes:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0059:entry=virtus

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=fortitudo&fromdoc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0059

Going by the usual Latin accent rules, agonia should be stressed agónia, but I don't know whether the fact that it's a borrowing from Greek may influence the stress somehow.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Well rather accentuated, but the Greek accent wasn't really a stress accent, was it?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I really don't know what happens once it's borrowed into Latin. Whether they kept the Greek accent just transforming it into a stress accent, or whether the word got accented in the natural Latin way. Possibly educated people did the former and the vulgus the latter... But I don't know.
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
... For "courage" you could also say fortitudo. Fortitudo is more restricted in meaning, while virtus is broader. You can compare them and see for yourself which seems better to you for your purposes:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0059:entry=virtus

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=fortitudo&fromdoc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0059
Fortitudo and English "fortitude" are the more standard and typical names for the Christian virtue which is the fruit of this mystery.

Many thanks to CarloScalisi for asking these questions, and Pacifica for her answers; both have helped me to give a better answer to another person, who has asked, in another place, about the Latin names for the fruits of the Rosary.

The Rosary in Latin (including the "titles" of the mysteries) and many other Latin prayers may be found at Thesaurus Precum Latinarum. Unfortunately, that site does not give the Latin names of the fruits, as far as I know.
 
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