Horace, Odes I, 1.

ovidia nemausa

New Member
Hello,

I have a doubt regarding this fragment, Horace (Odes I,1):
..nunc viridi membra sub arbuto
stratus, nunc ad aquae lene caput sacrae..

(roughly: “..now with limbs stretched under a green bush, now by the mellow source of sacred waters..”)

I don’t see how ‘membra’ works grammatically with ‘stratus’.

Thanks in advance for any comment.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It's an accusative of respect, a construction that's very frequent in Greek, less so in Latin, except in poetry where it's pretty much all over the place.
 
Yeah, it's a peculiar construction that's only used with body parts or actions related to them, where either active and passive, or two different subjects, get telescoped: membra strāvī + strātus jaceō => membra strātus jaceō; genua quatiuntur + ego quatior => genua quatior.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I would have thought it's not only used with body parts. I would be surprised if you couldn't find examples that don't comprise any body parts.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I would have thought it's not only used with body parts. I would be surprised if you couldn't find examples that don't comprise any body parts.
Here's an example. I'm sure there must be a few others although, it's true, body parts are involved in the vast majority of cases.
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illustris
It's an accusative of respect, a construction that's very frequent in Greek, less so in Latin, except in poetry where it's pretty much all over the place.
Do you remember how we used to meditate upon the accusative of respect like 8 years ago? We were also summoning some Bitmap's post as to support one's point ;D
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Do you remember how we used to meditate upon the accusative of respect like 8 years ago? We were also summoning some Bitmap's post as to support one's point ;D
Yes, I remember it a little. It was in that Venus poem where birds were percussae corda or something along those lines, right?
 
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