Homework I am able to see the girls

Good evening, this is Brian. I was tasked with translating five English sentences into Latin. I'm confused with translating the word correctly in sentence four. I'm wondering if I could use the verb corrigere (second person singular) to accurately translate this. Could a verb be used or is a noun preferable? Also, if it is translated with a noun I suppose quaesitum would be in the dative case since correctly would be the direct object. Thanks for the help.

Sincerely,

Brian

1. I am able to see the girls.
Possum videre puellas.
2. He is going to the Forum today.
It Forum hodie.
3. I want to read the book.
Volo legere librum.
4. You want to answer the question correctly.
Vis repondere quaesitum (corrigis).
5. We do not want to walk to school.
Nolumus ambulare scholae.
 

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1. I am able to see the girls.
Possum videre puellas.
Correct

2. He is going to the Forum today.
It Forum hodie.
ad forum

3. I want to read the book.
Volo legere librum.
Correct

4. You want to answer the question correctly.
Vis repondere quaesitum (corrigis).
Respondere is constructed with ad + accusative.
For "correctly", you need an adverb, for example recte:

ad quaesitum respondere vis.


5. We do not want to walk to school.
Nolumus ambulare scholae.
ad scholam
 
Yikes, I had a real lapse in judgement when I translated five. Somehow I pictured the principle of the dative case (when something is being done to/for the object). I completely negated the proposition. :doh:I understand the use of ad in sentence two. I thought ire was translated to “going to” so I assumed to was included in that irregular verb, which was a stretch of my imagination. Also, using an adverb in sentence four makes sense and solves my original question. I’m thinking, since respondere is the infinitive and means to respond, why would ad be needed to translate sentence four? I did not understand your explanation. Thanks so much for taking the time to help me.

Sincerely,

Brian
 

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Somehow I pictured the principle of the dative case (when something is being done to/for the object).
You actually sometimes find the dative used that way (i.e. as a dative of direction) in poetry, but not in regular Latin.

I’m thinking, since respondere is the infinitive and means to respond, why would ad be needed to translate sentence four?
Think of ad quaestionem respondere as "to respond to a question" in English.
 
BrianBerbati dixit:
I’m thinking, since respondere is the infinitive and means to respond, why would ad be needed to translate sentence four?
Think of ad quaestionem respondere as "to respond to a question" in English.
Ah, I see it now! It seems to me like this can be easy to miss, is there a trick or method I can use to make sure that does not happen?

Sincerely,

Brian
 

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Ah, I see it now! It seems to me like this can be easy to miss, is there a trick or method I can use to make sure that does not happen?

Sincerely,

Brian
You need to know verbs are constructed, and respondere just happens not to take accusative objects. That's a learning process.
 
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