If [Dracula] Dies, So Does England

moriartylives

New Member
Hello, I'm working on a game where there is a hidden inscription that reads: "If [Dracula] dies, so does England."

NOTE: "Dracula" could also be translated as "the Devil's Son," "Dragon's Son," "Son of the Devil," or "Son of the Dragon."

It's intended to be a curse that will enact in the event Dracula is killed. It was written/inlaid by a man, if that helps with the gender.

Thank you!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hello,

The gender of the person saying or writing the sentence doesn't matter in this case. It would matter if the sentence contained an adjective (or certain other words) referring to the speaker or writer.

With the name "Dracula", it can translate this way:

Si Dracula mortuus erit, Anglia quoque morietur.

Or, more concisely, this way:

Dracula mortuo Anglia quoque morietur.

The shorter version is a bit more ambiguous because out of context it could be interpreted as "When Dracula dies..." as well as "If Dracula dies..." This might not matter much, though, but you'll decide.

The same with "Devil's Son/Son of the Devil" would be:

Si Filius Diaboli mortuus erit, Anglia quoque morietur.
Filio Diaboli mortuo Anglia quoque morietur.

And with "Dragon's Son/Son of the Dragon":

Si Filius Draconis mortuus erit, Anglia quoque morietur.
Filio Draconis mortuo Anglia quoque morietur.
 
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