Improving my oral French

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Yea, it's a suppletive verb.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I wonder why, even in the present tense, there are forms taken from different Latin verbs: je vais, tu vas, il va, ils vont presumably from vado, but then nous allons, vous allez from ambulo. I could see taking different tenses from different verbs (Greek does it often enough, and even Latin does it now and again) but why would speakers of proto-French feel the need to mix and match their verbal roots within a single tense like that?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ok, here's another three sentences (with a great many R's ;) ).
No problem understanding you:

"Les utilisateurs de Wikipédia sont invités à écrire des articles eux-mêmes."

"Après le concert, les musiciens sont rentrés à l'hôtel."

"Ils sont convaincus que leur candidat est le meilleur."

You're doing good, so I feel bad picking nits, but here you go:

- You messed up the u in utilisateurs and musiciens, I think. It's no big deal since the words are still totally recognizable, but you made it sound like ou again.

- The eu in utilisateurs sounds off, but only slightly.

- The in in invités is supposed to be a nasal vowel, without any actual n sound.

- The l in your les musiciens sounds like an n to me, somehow... Maybe it was just a slip of the tongue or else a bizarre trick of the recording or my ears, dunno (l and n do sound a bit similar anyway, so...).

- Your Rs are still a bit too harsh.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Sounds a bit too close to an ou.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Here's another attempt at just the two words "Les utilisateurs" (I tried to kill two birds with one stone & fix the "u" problem as well.)
 

Attachments

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
That's better. Speaking of birds, I was thinking, before you posted the new recording, to tell you that the eu in utilisateurs is almost identical to the vowel in "bird".
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I wonder why, even in the present tense, there are forms taken from different Latin verbs: je vais, tu vas, il va, ils vont presumably from vado, but then nous allons, vous allez from ambulo. I could see taking different tenses from different verbs (Greek does it often enough, and even Latin does it now and again) but why would speakers of proto-French feel the need to mix and match their verbal roots within a single tense like that?
English does that with the verb "to be".
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Yep, was going to mention that.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Probably conflation with *h₂wes-, was, (to reside), *bʰúHt, be, (to become), and *h₁ésmi, is.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I wonder why, even in the present tense, there are forms taken from different Latin verbs: je vais, tu vas, il va, ils vont presumably from vado, but then nous allons, vous allez from ambulo. I could see taking different tenses from different verbs (Greek does it often enough, and even Latin does it now and again) but why would speakers of proto-French feel the need to mix and match their verbal roots within a single tense like that?
They didn't chose to, it's because with Vulgar Latin, vadere and *alare were both in use, and eventually merged together in Gallo-Romance. It also happened in Spanish.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Yes, I know they didn't consciously decide what verb forms to use. I just find it curious that they would accept forms of vado in the first, second, and third person singular and third person plural, and simultaneously reject them in the first and second person plural; it seems so arbitrary.
 

LCF

One of "those" people
Is it true that French accent (which I adore) was developed as a result of someone having a severe speech impediment?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Speaking of going, the English verb "to go" also replaced its past tense with another verb.

it seems so arbitrary.
It's hard to think of any kind of language change that doesn't seem arbitrary. You can identify a few mechanisms that follow a certain pattern (like analogy or grammaticalisation), but whether they trigger or not is arbitrary again ...
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Can one use trigger in a medium way like that?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes. Well, the examples are in a different sense than the one you were using, but if it can be done there, why not here...

b. intransitive. Of an electronic device: to change state in response to a momentarily applied signal.
1933 P.O. Electr. Engineers' Jrnl. 26 63/2 A tube is now manufactured capable of ‘triggering’ both ‘on’ and ‘off’.
1967 Electronic Engin. 39 752/1 A theory was required to account for the existence of a minimum ionization current below which the Schmitt fails to trigger, and a maximum above which the Schmitt fails to reset.
 
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