Mediaeval In chori pariete, dum templi ianua nobilius instruitur, exuviae fratris Augustiniani repertae, sine dubio ob peculiarem viri Sanctimoniam ibi...

tomasisla

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Hello. I'm studying the history of a monastery and I have found some information on a 1644 book: "Alphabetum augustinianum", by Thomas de Herrera. I can't translate the last sentence of the text related to the monastery I' studying, so I would appreciate very much anyone's help. The sentence is:

"In chori pariete, dum templi ianua nobilius instruitur, exuviae fratris Augustiniani repertae, sine dubio ob peculiarem viri Sanctimoniam ibi reconditae; a Fratribus subtus chorum supra quandam trabem minus decenter translatae conservantur."

I have attached an image of the page. Thank you for your help.
 

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Pacifica

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Hello,

Here's what it says:

"Within the wall of the choir, while the door of the church was being remade in a nobler fashion, there were found the remains of an Augustinian friar, doubtless buried there on account of the man's singular holiness. The friars moved the remains less becomingly on a beam under the choir, where they are now being kept."
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

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To be pedantic, I think you have to say in English 'moved the remains to [a place on] a beam, to avoid the suggestion that the beam was being used for transport.
 

Pacifica

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That's not pedantic. You're right.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

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To be pedantic, being properly pedantic means being right, by definition. The question is whether it's worth making the correction in any given context.
 

Pacifica

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To be pedantic, being properly pedantic means being right, by definition.
Yes, but you can also be right without being pedantic. That's what I meant to say you were in this case.
 

Pacifica

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Admittedly, the Latin itself is ambiguously worded in the first place. But it's more likely that what is meant is that the remains are being kept on the beam rather than that they were moved on it.
 

tomasisla

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Thank you very much, Pacifica. I coudn't find the meaning of the text. About tour discussion about being pedantic or not, I would never had believed that the relics were moved using a beam to transport them.
 

tomasisla

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To Clemens: about the translation of relics, the monastery was abandonned about 1812. That was the burial place of the founders and one of their sons, who was the first Count of Siruela (among many other people). I don't know where the bodies and the tombstones where translated. I'm still reading documents about the first centuries of the Monastery. I guess that I will find it when I get to its last years.
 
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