In death we live

A

Anonymous

Guest
Like the topic says, I am attempting to transalte "In death we live". The meaning of the sentence being we only start living after we die (with no biblical tie whatsoever). The results I came up with so far have been:

- insum mortis vixi
- insum mortis vive

Input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
 

Iynx

Consularis
Too many verbs. Insum means "I am in", vixi "I have lived" and vive "live!".

Literally "in death we live" would be in morte vivimus.

I don't know exactly what you are trying to say, but as soon as I wrote those last three Latin words I heard in my head the familiar words of the Book of Common Prayer: "In the midst of life we are in death.." I don't believe those words are scriptural. But we could certainly put them into Latin:

In medio vitae sumus in morte...

Hope this helps.
 

QMF

Civis Illustris

Iynx

Consularis
Maybe you're right, qmf. I was using the ablative of medium, -ii. It looks like in medio classically could be followed either by an ablative or by a genitive-- in medio vitae or vita.

But there is also an adjective, medius, -a, -um (as in in medias res), and I think that in media vita, or just your media vita, would also be grammatically correct, and I agree that it sounds good.

In defense of my solution, I would point to Psalm cxxxviii:7 : Si ambualvero in medio tribulationis... "If I walk in the midst of troubles..."
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Well medium, -ii is clearly a substantive of medius. As I said, I'm not certain, but from what I've seen in Vergil (I can't think of a specific example now, sorry) when one says "middle" in Latin one usually uses medius to describe the thing in question. I wish I could find an example so I could elaborate on what I mean.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Ty both for the swift replies. I ended up going with In Morte Vivemus, I think it's the best one for what I intend.

Again, thanks for the answers!
 
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