Interesting Words (moved from Games)

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Reminds me of the primordial monster Rahab, which is a different word.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
People compare Arabic and German a lot. To many non-natives, the existence of various guttural sounds probably stands out. Obviously, if you survey the phonetic inventories in depth, you’d find many differences, but I know what she meant.
 

Clemens

Civis Illustris
People compare Arabic and German a lot. To many non-natives, the existence of various guttural sounds probably stands out. Obviously, if you survey the phonetic inventories in depth, you’d find many differences, but I know what she meant.
Yeah, I know, but I don't share that impression.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
I mean, me neither :D
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Again, the etymology:

A row of camels or a train is something that trickles. Camels or wagons are passing — trickling by — one by one.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The word "soap", in its various forms in various languages, really has been all over the place:

 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
How mysterious!
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
It looks like IE borrowed it to me and some scholars. AA *čaraw has been reconstructed.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Shelley uses the term "the to-come" in a couple of his poems, meaning that which is to come, the future. Apparently, he isn't the only one (the OED has a few citations from other authors) but it's in his work that I first encountered the expression a few days ago. I wonder if it's a calque from French "l'avenir" (which is literally "the to-come", with "to-come" long fused into one word) or if it evolved independently.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I guess it could also have been calqued on Latin venturum.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Only dipshit hipsters like me use this one, e.g.:
'You say you only tipped 15%? That's bad joss, big guy.'
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
'Soil', as a noun meaning 'earth', is etymologically unrelated to the verb meaning 'to get dirty'. No, really. And the etymology of the latter may surprise you.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
'Soil', as a noun meaning 'earth', is etymologically unrelated to the verb meaning 'to get dirty'. No, really. And the etymology of the latter may surprise you.
I'm most likely being obtuse, but I don't understand...I thought they were ultimately from the same root, although the noun was influenced by another.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
I realise it isn't the easiest thing in the world to write sentences suitable for language learners, but come on. This isn't likely to make someone think, 'Wow! Now I've got to apply myself, as I just can't wait to have acquire the linguistic resources to hold my own against these sparkling swahiliphone wits.'
 
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