Interesting Words (moved from Games)

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Lol.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It's better than the sentence that went "I am trying to do!"
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I mean, at least the English version. The Swahili version may have been idiomatic; I have no idea, obviously.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Now, having written an exercise book myself, I know how hard it can be to come up with sentences that are both simple and natural as well as suitable to illustrate a particular grammar point.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
*-hw is definitely one of my favorite things about Proto-Germanic.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
OMG OMG OMG this is an amazing one.

Dutch "hoeveelheid" means "amount" or "quantity".

But literally/semi-etymologically it is "howmuchhood".

Someone may tell me that quantity, from quantitas, is pretty much the same, but it isn't quite. Because quantus, unlike hoeveel, isn't a compound.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Oooh this is interesting too.
Duo31.PNG


Apparently, Dutch er, which means literally "there", can work like French en, which means literally "thence". That is, it can translate to "some/any (of it/them)" or "(a specified amount or number) of it/them".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Dutch "ondanks" means "despite". That's like, literally, "unthanks". Imagine saying "I sleep well unthanks to the noise". That would rock.
 
Wow, Dutch rules. Makes me think of my old (literally) pal Gertrude. Would love to hear my girl P speaking that Nederlants one ' these days.
Pacifica dixit:
Apparently, Dutch er, which means literally "there", can work like French en, which means literally "thence". That is, it can translate to "some/any (of it/them)" or "(a specified amount or number) of it/them".
My instinct told me this is a chance syncretism of the old gen. plural pronoun, and it seems I'm right: but it's still cool!
 
I noticed that Polish also uses the construction of impersonal have (at least with the negative) & wondered what the German is/where they could've gotten it. I don't think Slavic does it generally, e.g.:

Nie ma ich. [not has of-them] 'They are not here. There's none.'

Isn't the French like Il y a 'There is' & Il n'y a pas de ___?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Would love to hear my girl P speaking that Nederlants one ' these days.
That's not going to happen any time soon, unless you'd be content to hear me uttering a few simple sentences. I'm just having a bit of fun with Duolingo. The language I want to be studying seriously right now is still Arabic, but I haven't had much time or energy for it these days because I have quite a lot of work. When I take a break, I chill out with super-easy Duolingo. I started with the Arabic course, actually, but I did so rather too late, when I'd already learned more grammar than is included in the whole Duolingo course. It seemed to me like Duolingo could be a good way to just learn a few basics in a relaxed manner, though, and I thought why not do a bit of Dutch that way. Then since that was incredibly easy, I wanted to see what would happen with a language utterly alien to me, so I took Swahili too. That is indeed a bit harder, but still easy enough because, well, it's Duolingo, not anything advanced.
Isn't the French like Il y a 'There is' & Il n'y a pas de ___?
Yes. Literally "it (not) there has".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
wondered what the German is
The German actually doesn't involve the verb "have"—at least, the expression that I know of doesn't. Maybe there's another, less usual one that I don't. The one I know is es gibt, literally "it gives".
 
unless you'd be content to hear me uttering a few simple sentences.
Very content, if those sentences had a certain... drift? :dynamite:
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Italian "calciatore" = (BE) "footballer"/(AE) "soccer player".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
To tree.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Spanish "ubicar", meaning to position, place, locate, situate. I mean, that's like making "where" into a verb.
 
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