Latin Lit. for a Total Beginner

Little Augustine

New Member
Hi, I am a Latin beginner (just have the basic declensions and conjugations down) is there any good literature for a beginner like myself to learn new words and practice reading? My text book is really boring so and I would like to enjoy reading something at least mildly compelling. Any recommendations?
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
Mihi nomen est Stiltonius, Hieronymus Stiltonius by Geronimo Stilton (the main character is a mouse who also happens to be the editor of a newspaper named "Echo rodentis")
IMHO the story is funny, very easy to read and has some pictures that help you understand the words. There are some terms like "perspicilla solaria" and exclamations like "Pro mille caseis lactis concreti globulosis!" which do not exist in classical latin, but are neologisms that you can easily understand.
Ut ad extremum expolirer, Rosea in tabernam quandam me duxit, in qua sumpsi (et nihil augeo) centum et altera centum perspicilla solaria. -Hem... Minime. His sumptis stultulus videris. Minime, his autem pollinctor videris... his autem mus scelestus. Ecce, haec forsitan... sane minime, haec ne disputanda quidem sunt. Res tibi desperata, magister... paucis verbis, tibi est rostrum mendosum. Animo deficiebam. - Rostrum mendosum? Quid est? Minister tabernarius insolenter dixit: - Ah, in nulla culpa es... tibi est rostrum insolitum... non omnibus licet venuste perspicilla solaria sumere. Nonne vis sollemnius quoddam temptandum? Scis, perpensa aetate tua... Talia verba accepi, silens. Ex improviso Rosea strepuit et ob hanc rem exsilui: -Ecce! Sume haec, magister! Do mercedem annuam pignus, ni ea sunt perspicilla tibi aptissima!
If your username "Little Augustine" means you are a devout reader of Augustine of Hippo's works, I suggest the Christomimesis of Thomas from Kempis (Augustinian writer).
 
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Little Augustine

New Member
Mihi nomen est Stiltonius, Hieronymus Stiltonius by Geronimo Stilton (the main character is a mouse who also happens to be the editor of a newspaper named "Echo rodentis")
IMHO the story is funny, very easy to read and has some pictures that help you understand the words. There are some terms like "perspicilla solaria" and exclamations like "Pro mille caseis lactis concreti globulosis!" which do not exist in classical latin, but are neologisms that you can easily understand.
Ut ad extremum expolirer, Rosea in tabernam quandam me duxit, in qua sumpsi (et nihil augeo) centum et altera centum perspicilla solaria. -Hem... Minime. His sumptis stultulus videris. Minime, his autem pollinctor videris... his autem mus scelestus. Ecce, haec forsitan... sane minime, haec ne disputanda quidem sunt. Res tibi desperata, magister... paucis verbis, tibi est rostrum mendosum. Animo deficiebam. - Rostrum mendosum? Quid est? Minister tabernarius insolenter dixit: - Ah, in nulla culpa es... tibi est rostrum insolitum... non omnibus licet venuste perspicilla solaria sumere. Nonne vis sollemnius quoddam temptandum? Scis, perpensa aetate tua... Talia verba accepi, silens. Ex improviso Rosea strepuit et ob hanc rem exsilui: -Ecce! Sume haec, magister! Do mercedem annuam pignus, ni ea sunt perspicilla tibi aptissima!
If your username "Little Augustine" means you are a devout reader of Augustine of Hippo's works, I suggest the Christomimesis of Thomas from Kempis (Augustinian writer).
Haha! Yes, I do indeed like Augustine and aspire to read his theses in their complete authenticity someday. Also, I can remember reading Geronimo! in grade 3. However, I am pretty sure it was not written in Latin. Thank you for suggestion, I will definitely check that out.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Auditor et Discipulus
I do indeed like Augustine
De imitatione Christi has received the appraisal of many people, not necessarily Catholics or religious at all. The Lutheran Dietrich Bonhoeffer, in a letter to his friend Eberard Bethge dated the fourth Sunday of Advent 1943, wrote: "I read the Imitatio Christi in its latin version every once in a while... I enjoy it more in Latin than in vernacular". Since the Christomimesis is one of Augustine's topics and the latin is easy, you would do well to consider reading it.

I can remember reading Geronimo! in grade 3
I spent many evenings on Geronimo Stilton. Then grew out of this habit. The editor issued a latin translation only to claim the book has been translated into fifty languages (they wanted to make it a round number).
 
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