Let fate guide my actions.

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
To be clear: the third person subjunctive of "guide", with "fate" as subject. There would be no literal equivalent of "let" in Latin.
 
So would one translate it as

Parcae. Obsecro vos, Probet fatum actionis meus regit.

So I wouldn't use Let I would just use the third person of guide, as such
Parcae. Obsecro vos. Fatum actionis meus regat.

On a similar how would one translate:

Fate guide me to my destination
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The cases of actionis and meus are wrong.

In fact, maybe you should use a word for "let" here. Sorry, I hadn't read the thread attentively enough and had only the thread title in mind, so that I didn't realize you were addressing the Parcae, hence my affirmation that you should use the subjunctive while it isn't certain.

Are you commanding the Parcae to let fate guide/allow fate to guide your actions, or just expressing a wish that fate may guide your actions, without necessarily telling the Parcae that they, personally, should let it guide your actions?
 
It is another of the fictional incantations that I am working on translating.
The spell caster is invoking a spell that enables him to act in a social situation with perfect grace and timing, saying just the right thing at just the rite time.
as for the me using the wrong form of meus would I use the word meae instead?

As I have worded all of my Latin incantations as invocations to various mythological gods the spell caster is requesting that fate guide his actions
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
as for the me using the wrong form of meus would I use the word meae instead?
No. "My actions" is the direct object of "guide", so it should be in the accusative.
the spell caster is requesting that fate guide his actions
Yes, but here you are saying "Fates, let fate guide my actions". So you are directly speaking to the "fates", and you are telling them "let fate guide my actions". Now, with the latter ("let fate guide my actions"), are you giving a command to the "fates" whom you are addressing, telling them that they, personally, should let fate guide your actions (or, differently put, allow fate to guide your actions), or are you only expressing a wish that fate should guide your actions, without necessarily meaning that the "fates", personally, should be the ones allowing it to be done?

Or, if what I mean isn't clear, maybe it could be made clearer with different examples:

In English you can say "let" in roughly two kinds of situations:

1) To give a direct order to someone to allow something to be done: e.g. if someone is holding me and I shout "Let me go!": I'm telling them they should let me go, allow me to go.

2) To express a wish in more of an impersonal manner, not really commanding any real person to allow the thing to be done: e.g. if I feel like seeing some snow and I sing "Let it snow!": I'm not really telling anyone to allow it to snow (whom?), but just expressing a wish.

These two things, however, are expressed in different ways in Latin.

Which sort of situation do you think you have in your sentence?
 
Now that you have explained it such it makes sense that the spell caster is in fact commanding the fates to guide his actions as the definition of magic in the game is a spell caster enforcing his will upon reality.
Also what would the accusative case of meus be?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Indeed you are correct. I was unsure of my original wording.

Parcae. Nona nens, Decima metiens, Morta secans, stamina fatorum; dominae meae, obsecro vos. Actiones meas regat.

Would the bolded portion of the above be the most accurate translation?

The beginning of the above is simply the spell caster invoking them by name.

If the above translation is correct, would the following be correct as well?
Guide my timeliness and Guide me to my destination


Opportunitas mea regit. and Me ad locum meum regit.
 

Absurdism

Member
These two things, however, are expressed in different ways in Latin.
I wouldn't say that's necessarily true. The distinction between the jussive and hortatory subjunctives aren't formally made in Latin, but they are translated and interpreted differently in English.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I wouldn't say that's necessarily true. The distinction between the jussive and hortatory subjunctives aren't formally made in Latin, but they are translated and interpreted differently in English.
I'm not speaking about the difference between jussive and hortatory subjunctive, but between the jussive subjunctive (e.g. hoc fiat) and a second person imperative meaning "let/allow" (e.g. sine hoc fieri).
How would one then translate Guide my timeliness and Guide me to my destination?
What do you mean by "Guide my timeliness"?
 
The incantation affects the spell casters timing, but I could not find a Latin word for timing so I thought timeliness would be a good substitute. I can offer more details when I am at home and have access to my books.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes, more details could be helpful to determine which Latin word(s) would be best there.

Meanwhile, I can already tell you that in your above attempts, regit and regat are in the wrong persons and moods: regit is third person singular indicative active = "he/she/it guides", and regat is third person singular subjunctive active = (when used on its own) "let him/her/it guide". But here you need a second person plural* imperative, "guide (ye)!"

*Assuming all the phrases are addressing the fates. If one or the other is addressing a single person rather than several, then the imperative should be singular, of course.

Opportunitas mea is in the wrong case; it should be accusative since it's the direct object.

That's for the mere grammar. Now concerning word choice, I'll wait for more contextual details from you before I decide.
 
Ok thank you again for your patience, the example of how the spell allows the spell caster to experience a fortunate set of circumstances involving timing: the mage is in just the right place to meet someone, pick up a ride, etc.

For the invocation the spell caster is once again commanding all three fates to bend to his will.

I hope that clears everything up

As the spell caster is commanding all three fates I would want to use the second person plural imperative of guide, correct?

Would this also be a time where I would want to be the verb first?
Such as:
Parcae. Nona nens, Decima metiens, Morta secans, stamina fatorum; dominae meae, obsecro vos. Regite actiones meas.

Fates, Nona, spinning, Decima measuring, Morta cutting the threads of fate; my ladies, I implore you. Guide my actions.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
obsecro vos ut regatis actiones meas.
Well that's "I implore you to guide my actions", but obsecro vos, regite actiones meas is ok for "I implore you, guide my actions".
 
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