Liber VIII Cap 29 cedentibus circumfusi

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
At nostrī equitēs, quī paulō ante cum resistentibus fortissimē cōnflīxerant, laetitiā victōriae ēlātī magnō undique clāmōre sublātō cēdentibus circumfūsī, quantum equōrum vīrēs ad persequendum dextraeque ad caedendum valent, tantum eō proeliō interficiunt.

the enemy is breaking and the cavalry is surrounding them and slaughtering them.

but why is it cēdentibus circumfūsī? Wouldn't this mean that they were surrounded by those who were retreating?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Wouldn't this mean that they were surrounded by those who were retreating?
That's how I took it at first without thinking, but in fact it's more likely to be the opposite here: Caesar's cavalry have spread around (surrounded) the retreating enemy, cedentibus, which is dative here and not ablative.
 

AoM

nulli numeri
Yup, dative with a compound verb.

(It's been permanently etched on my brain.)
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Yup, dative with a compound verb.

(It's been permanently etched on my brain.)
So it is the cavalry, having been poured around the enemy. I was struggling to figure out how it could be passive...
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It's passive in middle sense, i.e. more like "having poured (themselves) around..." rather than "having been poured (by someone else)".
 
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