Library courtyard

Peter Stallard

New Member
Please help....
Which is correct "biblioteca platea" or " platea biblioteca" ? or are they both wrong.If so what is correct ? Please excuse my total ignorance of Latin.

Thanks
Peter
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
What is a library courtyard? A platea is a street.
 

Peter Stallard

New Member
Well thanks Matthaeus that gets me somewhere but not quite where I wanted to go.I appreciate you pointing out the mistake.This is the reason I am here on this forum, to get my Latin correct rather than bungling forward with my egregious error while making a complete ass of myself. So, how would I describe a courtyard in a library, in Latin, if you please ?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Area bibliothecae, maybe.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Perhaps we could uſe 'ſubdiualis' ('under daylight') or 'ſubdialia' for 'courtyard'.
I think subdialia are more like open-air galleries. I imagine by courtyard he means an unroofed area at ground level with grass, and perhaps trees or a garden, that's enclosed (at least partially) by the building.
 

Peter Stallard

New Member
Thanks for the suggestions but I was thinking that maybe the word "peristlium" might suffice for courtyard.If that is acceptable to those more knowledgable than I, then how would I correctly put the two words ( biblioteca and peristlium )together to make Latin grammatical sense ?
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
Thanks for the suggestions but I was thinking that maybe the word "peristlium" might suffice for courtyard.If that is acceptable to those more knowledgable than I, then how would I correctly put the two words ( biblioteca and peristlium )together to make Latin grammatical sense ?
I believe the word is normally spelled peristylium. "Library courtyard" would then be peristylium bibliothecae. An alternative spelling is peristylum.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Was there any particular requirement for there to be no columns implied in the translation?
No, but was there any particular requirement for there to be columns? ;)

Does your courtyard have rows of columns around it, Peter?
A platea is a street.
Most usually, yes. But in post-classical it can also mean "An open space in a house, an area, court-yard", so perhaps it's still a possible option...
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Where has all this talk of columns come from all of a sudden?
I think it's normal to let the OP know what a peristylium precisely is in order to see if it's what he needs, no...? I don't understand why you seem to be taking this as a problem/attack.
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
I think it's normal to let the OP know what a peristylium precisely is in order to see if it's what he needs, no...?
That's fair enough. On the other hand, the OP had the chance to stipulate the specifications of his courtyard in three separate posts, and yet even when Imber Ranae put words into his mouth by suggesting what the OP may have had in mind, the OP side-stepped the prompt for further information and merely put forward his own suggestion of peristylium.

I don't understand why you seem to be taking this as a problem.
The only problem is understanding why you seem to regard persons requesting translations as entirely exonerated from the need to be specific even when prompted to do so, whilst apparently insisting that translators should anticipate a requester's requirements from every conceivable angle. If you are painstaking enough to be capable of such a degree of anticipation then that's clearly not a fault, but I think it is a little unfair to expect everyone to come up to your own exceptionally high standards.

Finally, the OP asked whether "the word peristlium (sic) might suffice for courtyard". When "might suffice" was the extent of the demand, was it not reasonable to proceed on the basis that it does?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The only problem is understanding why you seem to regard persons requesting translations as entirely exonerated from the need to be specific even when prompted to do so, whilst apparently insisting that translators should anticipate a requester's requirements from every conceivable angle. If you are painstaking enough to be capable of such a degree of anticipation then that's clearly not a fault, but I think it is a little unfair to expect everyone to come up to your own exceptionally high standards.
Of course it's better for us when the one making a request gives precisions, but I think people don't necessarily always realize how many different things may be meant by a word. Perhaps he thought of a courtyard as something straightforward enough not to need any more precision, and it's understandable. Imber Ranae did not formulate his post exactly as a question, so perhaps the OP agreed with IR's definition without feeling the need to say "yes, that's it". And IR made no mention of columns actually, so even if he had replied... I think that on this point we can't really reproach the OP for not thinking of letting us know whether his courtyard had columns or not before we actually asked him - if we can't think of every conceivable angle, he can't either. :D
Finally, the OP asked whether "the word peristlium (sic) might suffice for courtyard". When "might suffice" was the extent of the demand, was it not reasonable to proceed on the basis that it does?
Strictly, yes. But I think it's good to check a little further if it's really the word he needs, in case he had found it without an accurate definition. So I think Ealdboc's post was appropriate and not misplaced at all.
I think it is a little unfair to expect everyone to come up to your own exceptionally high standards.
By the way, I think this is something you are sometimes guilty of. ;)
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Aurifex isn't wrong to mention that the OP has been singularly remiss in clarifying his request. It's something I noticed as well. If he winds up with the wrong end of the stick it'll be none of our faults.
 
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