Librum hunc temporis injurias passum novantiquo tegmine muniri curavit / R.D. / A° 1696

Hello, I've come across this, in relation to the Register Book of an old Norman church in Wales, UK:

"In 1696, Robert Davies of Gwysaney had the Book of Llandaff rebound. There is an inscription on the upper board formed of small brass nails that bear a few traces of enamel. The inscription reads: "Librum hunc temporis injurias passum novantiquo tegmine muniri curavit / R.D. / A° 1696"

Obviously the bit at the end means "In 1696, Robert Davies .." - then, is "curo" being used with an infinitive "muniri", in the sense of "to have something done"? Am I right in thinking that that is an unusual construction? I'm also puzzled by "novantiquo" - presumably "nov" is a prefix?

Any help on translating this gratefully received.
 

cinefactus

Censor

  • Censor

  • Patronus

Thanks very much, much obliged. Could the gerundive "muniendum" have been used instead of the infinitive, to express the same thing? (That's the construction that I was taugh.)
 

cinefactus

Censor

  • Censor

  • Patronus

Thanks very much, much obliged. Could the gerundive "muniendum" have been used instead of the infinitive, to express the same thing? (That's the construction that I was taugh.)
Lewis & Short gives examples of just about every possible construction with curo, including the gerundive.
 
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