Looking for some technical words regarding sound

Cornicula

New Member
I am writing something in Latin in which I need to use a few technical terms that relate to sound. I have searched a neo-Latin dictionary without success. Specifically, terms I'm looking for are "frequency, high- or low-frequency, high- or low-pitch, audio recording [incisio ____?], sonar [think I'll have to make up a circumlocution for this one], Hertz [I know this is a name, and so it will probably stay the same, but in Latin, I want to write "a sound of 30 Hertz/sonus quinquaginta Hertz" and not "a 30 Hertz sound" like in English, and with Hertz just being a name, it confounds me.]." More general question, are things that lack vocal cords said to have "voces?" Do animals generally have "voces?" How would say an animal's call? In this instance, a whale's? I think "cantus" is will be appropriate in some instances like our "whale song" in English but maybe not all. TIA.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Do animals generally have "voces?"
Of course.

How would say an animal's call?
Probably, depends on the animal. Orbis Pictus has a nice collection of such terms right after Invitatio: cornix cornicatur, ovis balat, cicada stridet...

In this instance, a whale's?
Mugitus? :)

are things that lack vocal cords said to have "voces?"
Sounds counter-intuitive.

a few technical terms that relate to sound.
In such cases I plunge into Google books. There are no textbooks for scientific Latin. :( Looks like tonus is pitch, e. g. https://books.google.pt/books?id=FddDjaMt7MMC&pg=PA141#v=onepage&q&f=false
pitch: tonus
high pitch: tonus acutus
low pitch: tonus gravis
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Incisio is the common verbal noun from incidere afaik.
Yes, and it primarily denotes the action: http://lexica.linguax.com/forc2.php?searchedLG=incisio If your wish is to express the result, i. e. recorded sound, the best way to say it in Latin would be literally say sonus incisus. Since you write in Latin, surely you know that.

I was thinking about high/low frequency. Of course, summa frequentia would be fine for "very high frequency", but on the whole, I believe it' safe to say magna/maxima/parva/minima frequentia. Here is an example of infinite parva velocitas: https://books.google.pt/books?id=jaCshtaXs78C&pg=PA69&dq=parva+velocitas+mechanica&hl=pt-PT&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwichJT01uTvAhXD2-AKHUnZDPAQ6AEwAXoECAQQAg#v=onepage&q=parva velocitas mechanica&f=false. Clearly, often an adjective would suffice: "high-frequency vibrations" = frequentissimae vibrationes (see the example above), "low-frequency sound" = sonus gravis.
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
Hertz [I know this is a name, and so it will probably stay the same, but in Latin, I want to write "a sound of 30 Hertz/sonus quinquaginta Hertz" and not "a 30 Hertz sound" like in English, and with Hertz just being a name, it confounds me.]."
Hertz, Heinrich R., is a name, but in this context you want hertz (lower case), which is not a proper name but a unit of measure, like meter and gram. It might be useful to circumlocute towards the meaning of hertz, "one cycle per second". Alternatively, maybe you can see how terms like coulomb, newton, joule, and watt, which also are units of measure that come from people's names but are not names, are treated in scientific Latin.
 

Tlepolemus

Active Member
Diccionario auxiliar Español-Latín, Del Col (2007):
  • alta frecuencia: alta vel áltior frequéntia (eléctrica); maior, áuctior, elevata vel elevátior frequéntia
  • baja frecuencia: minor (vel minutior, vel depréssior, vel depressa) frequéntia (eléctrica)
  • tono mayor: vocis genus durum
  • tono menor: vocis genus molle
  • grabación digital: incísio digitalis
  • grabación fonográfica: magnetophónica incísio
  • sónar: per ultrasonos localizatórium vel gubernáculum; instrumentum sub aqua sonos emittens, repercussos excípiens
  • hercio: hertziana vel hertiana mensura; crebritatis mensura
The author doesn't state the source of these translations, but generally they were collected from modern Latin books and periodicals.
 

Gregorius Textor

Civis Illustris
Diccionario auxiliar Español-Latín, Del Col (2007):

  • tono mayor: vocis genus durum
  • tono menor: vocis genus molle
It is odd. I think of major keys as soft and pleasant, and minor keys as tough and rough, but here the opposite.

I wonder if this sheds any light on the origins of the German expressions D-Dur (D Major) and d-Moll (d minor)? I've always felt there was something mysterious about "Dur" and "Moll". My German-English dictionary just gives the translations, with no explanation.
 
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